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The impact of COVID-19 on people with multiple sclerosis

Research student and MSer, Hannah Morris shares the findings of a survey to determine the impact of COVID-19 on people living with multiple sclerosis (MS). hannah resized.png

As COVID-19 restrictions are gradually being eased and the number of people contracting the disease goes down, we can’t help but reflect on the whirlwind of changes that we have had to endure over the last year and beyond. Not a single person in the world has not been affected by the situation to some extent or another, whether it be directly by catching it, or simply having to change the daily routine to adhere to social distancing protocol regardless of if you have even known anyone to have had COVID-19. 

Our article was recently published in the latest edition of the New Pathways magazine, relating to out interesting findings on the experience and impact of COVID-19 on people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and I wanted to use this opportunity to share a summary of findings to those who may not have had a chance to read the article.

Most people, like myself, reported that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a neutral impact on them and in most cases, this was due to a mixture of positive and negative things that have come out of the situation. The negatives people mentioned were mostly due to anxieties as a result of treatment interruption, whether it be related to medication, various therapies, or even just routine appointments. The positives mostly related to being able to use the extra time at home to engage in hobbies, be with family more, or just to rest, something that those of us who suffer with MS fatigue are massively grateful for!

Unfortunately, however, for just over a third of those who took part in the survey, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on their mental health causing additional anxieties related to fear of themselves, or loved ones catching COVID-19, or the impact on treatment leaving them vulnerable to having a relapse or progressing. People who are younger, have a progressive diagnosis of MS and have existing psychological symptoms were more likely to report a negative impact.

We believe that these are the subgroup of people with MS that would benefit from additional support, perhaps by drawing upon the things that are working for those who have been managing well at this time. However, as we now see things returning to some level of ‘normal’ it is hoped that the negative impact may be lessened as treatments recommence and the risk of catching COVID-19 decreases.

This is just a summary of the findings, but if you’d like to read more, you can see the full article here: https://rdcu.be/cjTqW

Invitation to the MS community to support the development of a psychological intervention

As we make one final call for people to support in the next step towards developing a psychological intervention for people with MS to bridge a gap that is missing, yet needed for so many, we invite anyone who hasn’t yet to complete our survey here: https://forms.gle/5YTssp4pDVFciYEe9

You can also read more about our research on the topic here: https://research.reading.ac.uk/neurodegenerative-diseases/multiple-sclerosis/