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What is HSCT?

HSCT stands for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It was first used to treat cancer, but is now used as a therapy for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS).

The aim of HSCT treatment in MS is to ‘reset’ the immune system to stop it attacking the body.

You may have seen it in the news because some high profile celebrities with MS have had the treatment, including Hollywood actress Selma Blair.

What happens in HSCT treatment?

First, chemotherapy is given to the patient via an infusion in the vein to stimulate the production of stem cells in the body. This usually takes up to 10 days. The extra stem cells are then harvested from the blood and stored.

The patient then spends some time in hospital while they are given powerful chemotherapy which kills off much of their immune system. The stored stem cells are then reintroduced to the patient’s body. At this point, due to having a much weakened immune system, they are at very high risk of infection and cannot leave the hospital, are kept in isolation, and are often given antibiotics.

The hospital stay can last for a long time while the immune system is rebuilding itself – anywhere from between 10 to 160 days. Within three to six months, the immune system should gradually rebuild itself.

Who is eligible?

You can get HSCT on the NHS, but only if you meet very specific criteria.

Generally, current evidence says that the treatment works best for those who are under 45 and have relapsing MS, have had it less than 10 years, and have an Expanded Disability Status Scale of 5.5 or less.

There must be signs that the condition is active, meaning there must have been two relapses within the last 12 months, despite the person having taken disease-modifying treatment.

HSCT support

If you are looking for more information or support surrounding HSCT, there are plenty of Facebook communities that may be able to help...

Alternatively, you can call the MS-UK Helpline free on 0800 783 0518.