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#ThisIsMS - MS Awareness Week 2021 - Declan's story

This week is MS Awareness Week, and we'll be sharing stories from people living with multiple sclerosis (MS). Every experience with MS differs for everyone, and each story shows how indivudal the journey can be. Declan shares his story and how he didn't let his sympoms stop him from following his dream to study law. 

My name is Declan Groeger and I live in Cork, Ireland. I was diagnosed with RRMS in 1988, but I can trace the initial signs and symptoms to 1983. I had often yearned to study Law and in 1999 I decided to do something about it. I applied for, and was accepted, onto an evening course studying law at my local university – University College Cork. It seemed to be a daunting challenge which would involve three hours, three evenings a week for the initial two years and progress to three hours, four evening a week for the next two years. All this, plus tutorials and study whilst holding down a full-time position as a real-estate agent. 2_4.png

I did 16 subjects over the initial four years which was the same number of subjects that full-time students studied over three years. Lectures and tutorials were at pre-ordained times – all after a day’s work, but study times were a different matter entirely. My boss allowed me a certain amount of freedom and I was able to manage some study time while in the office. My non-college evenings became study time, as did Saturday mornings but that was it. I still needed family time with my wife and two daughters.

My handwriting had deteriorated over the years to where it was barely legible as tiredness eclipsed my drive to be as good as I could be, and I knew that note-taking in lectures could be illegible without context. I bought a laptop, and my wife bought a voice recognition program. I would read my notes into the laptop, within 24 hours, while everything was fresh in my mind.

After I had completed my four-year stint and achieved my Bachelor of Common Law (BCL) with a 2:1, I discovered that I was addicted and enrolled for a further two years for a post-grad and achieved Bachelor of Laws (LLB) and by that time in 2005 I had got the further education bug out of my system.

I retired in 2010, 22 years after my diagnosis due to fatigue. It was a good decision for me as my quality of life has improved. I have undertaken a number of online courses over the years to keep my brain as active as possible and I like to think that I doing alright, particularly in these strange Covid-19 times.