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Mr Baum goes to Westminster

Blogger Martin Baum was invited to an event at the House of Commons recently to launch a campaign. Here is his story of his experience...

In an age where blogging is a symbol of 21st century communication, the aim is as much for a blog to be read as it is to be written. As a multiple sclerosis (MS) blogger for various MS-related organisations I am no exception as I continue to try to engage with a loyal and growing readership.

As a writer I enjoy what I do very much but just like having MS it’s a lonely existence. However, sometimes, the unexpected does happen. I recently received an invitation from a charity called Overcoming MS (OMS) to attend a reception they were hosting at the House of Commons.

It was to launch a new campaign video giving everyone living with MS hope of recovery and it was not something I was going to pass up. The reception was sponsored by Stephen Lloyd MP and held in the Strangers Dining Room.

The person behind the promise of living a life free from MS was Professor George Jelinek, an Australian who devised the OMS seven-step recovery program which has enabled him to remain symptom free for 20 years. In truth, however, I was sceptical. Ever since beta interferons failed to sustain the promise of being the cure, I have become naturally wary of anything being promoted as such.

On reading more about Professor Jelinek’s regime prior to my trip to Westminster, it occurred to me my own lifestyle was already accommodating much of what he was advocating. The seven-step program is about following a strict curriculum of diet, sun, vitamin D, exercise, meditation, mindfulness, approved modifying medication, helping to prevent family members from getting MS, and changing a lifestyle for a healthier one.

Whilst I am not vegan I eat very little meat, preferring fish instead. I meditate regularly for ten minutes a day, I exercise as much as I am able to and enjoy the benefits of mindfulness. Most of all, I’ve been changing my lifestyle for a healthier one for several years which means, should I ever want to fully engage with the program, I’m only a couple of steps shy. 

That afternoon I met many MSers sharing a happy disposition to be living with the condition because their symptoms were no longer an issue. Many claimed their lesions had been repelled and that they were now leading happier MS-free lives as a result of following OMS.

Throughout the afternoon I mingled with many inspirational people. Just like any of us, neither MPs nor nobility are immune from being touched by MS because they have family and friends affected by it. Stephen Lloyd’s reason for being there was because he had a constituent who had MS who also follows the OMS approach. That was reason enough for him to sponsor the event.

As the afternoon ended and I parted from some truly inspiring people, I was left feeling that the OMS seven-step recovery program had already succeeded in helping many people. But then my thoughts turned to those who weren’t but might have benefited if they had.

Having MS is a game of patience. We bide our time in what often feels like an isolated existence, waiting for a more traditional breakthrough in the quest to find a cure for the condition. I’m left feeling that more MSers should at least try something like the OMS approach that’s as near to organic as it gets.