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Diet, exercise, meditation

by Martin Baum Martin 24.5.21.jpg

Recently, I was invited to be a contributor for a Q&A article about staying active with MS. Although I have blogged extensively about living life not MS – an issue which connects positively with the many MSers who follow me - this was the first time I had specifically been asked my thoughts about exercise and exercising.

In so far as it goes for one man and his stick, my idea of a physical workout is being taken to the local park by my wife/carer as regularly as my health and the weather dictates. What else was there for me to contribute? Well, as it turned out, quite a lot more than I had initially given myself credit for and this is how.

Aside from my limited bodily activity, I try to do the best I can. It is all about keeping to a regular routine, pretty much the same as for anyone else going to a gym. As any MSer can attest, with something as demotivating as this energy-sapping, soul-destroying illness, it is just so easy not to bother.  Some say 'What is the point? I cannot do it. I will not do it. I have MS!'

However, I can and do because there is a point. It is called structure, setting goals. Mine was taking a daily walk of a modest distance which inadvertently, led to an unexpected change in my diet. It didn’t just happen. It wasn’t MS, it was me. Eating too many of the wrong things was causing me to gain weight, making me breathless sometimes and causing a dip in my energy levels. I knew I had to do something.

I call it the Rocket Science diet or, rather, it isn’t. Whilst I wasn’t a great consumer of 'treats' per se, such as bread, biscuits, crisps, chocolate or alcohol for example, I decided to eliminate everything except fish, meat, fruit, vegetables and water from my diet on an ongoing trial basis. Has it been easy? Well, yes, given that this was something I felt was necessary in my limited capacity for taking responsibility for my health and welfare.  It’s also given yet more structure to my life. More goals to achieve.

However, there was something else which I unintentionally neglected to include in the article - meditation, which was something I had already been doing for some time and was inextricably a major part of my daily structure. 

MS is a sponge which just keeps absorbing and can leave MSers vulnerable, both physically and emotionally. I am no exception. Meditation, though, helps me achieve mental clarity, focus and, to quote Pink Floyd, “comfortably numb”. Since I have begun practising meditation, I believe I can stay one step ahead of MS or, at the very least, keep abreast of it.

Whilst I accept the combined holy trinity of diet, exercise and meditation is not for everyone, I passionately believe that doing something is better than nothing be it diet, exercise, or meditation. Take your pick. Think of it as living life on your terms instead of being at the behest of the life limiting conditions set down by MS.

Failure is Not an Option is a phrase associated with the Apollo 13 Moon landing mission and it should be something for all MSers to aspire to. By doing something is one less thing for a carer, physio, therapist, or neurologist to take responsibility for. To put it more succinctly, if an MSer cannot at least try to do the best they can for themselves, then why should anyone else?

It’s your MS, own it.