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Guest blog: Lisa Addie shares her #TeamPurple marathon story

Posted on: January 16 2020

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As soon as I found out I had a place on #TeamPurple in the Virgin Money London Marathon 2020, I started telling everyone, and I mean everyone!

Setting up a JustGiving page makes sharing your fundraising story so easy. As soon as I had mine set up, I shared the link with friends, family, work colleagues, clients and suppliers at work, even the WhatsApp group that all the neighbours in my building are part of.

Spreading the excitement

Being passionate and truly caring about the cause you are running for is infectious. People feel it and get behind you because of it. Don’t worry about boring people, or get wrapped up in what they think about what you’re doing, as that’s not a productive use of your time and energy.

As well as donations from friends and family, I sold teams on a football scratch card. If you search ‘football scratch card’ on Amazon you can buy a pack of 10 for £3. I sold each team for £10, with £200 to go to the winner and £200 for MS-UK. I timed it to be drawn just before Christmas which I think helped get the squares sold. I’ll definitely be doing another card pre-race day.

I have also been in touch with my local community manager at Tesco to organise bag packing. I’ll be pushing for Easter weekend so that the shop will be a bit busier, and it’s not long before the race itself! I have linked up with a couple of other runners near me so that we can take this on together and have more of a presence in-store.

Running for my mum

My mum had secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Her left leg was worst affected, making walking a daily struggle.

She would often fall in public and be left humiliated and, of course, in pain. crop_0.png

In September 2013, she was admitted to hospital for an unrelated skin infection. On discharge she was largely bed bound as her MS became increasingly aggressive, spurred on by a weakened immune system. A combination of all of the above led to her suffering a pulmonary embolism and passing away on 26/09/13. I don’t need to tell anyone how hard losing a parent is. I am completely and utterly lost without my mum and, even six years on, it’s as rubbish as it was then!

I was too young, selfish and naïve to take control of the situation for mum. I want to run the London 2020 Marathon in memory of her and to raise funds for MS UK to be able to help others with MS because of this. MS is misunderstood, it affects everyone differently and is completely unpredictable. I want to play my part in changing this.

My top tips

If you’re training for a big run, get started on your fundraising as soon as you can so you can smash it out of the park early and focus on training

Talk to everyone about it. It will connect you with people in a way you would never have imagined.

Use social media. I’m documenting my training on Instagram (@healthylivinglisa_). It’s an amazing tool to get chatting to other runners and widen your network even further.

Get yourself into the Facebook group and connect with other MS-UK runners. There are also a few London Marathon Facebook groups with thousands of people to chat to and get tips from. 1_2.jpg

Not everyone has this opportunity, certainly not those that are badly affected with MS, so it’s important to recognise how much of a privilege we all have to be part of #TeamPurple and what an honour it is to spread awareness and take this challenge on.

Fundraiser of the Month: “I said I wouldn’t run another half marathon…”

Posted on: December 16 2019

Grandad.jpgWhen you think you won't get the fundraising bug and you do... Lauren Chrimes does it for grandad!

I began fundraising for MS-UK back in 2017. It was an obvious choice of charity as my grandad was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) when he was younger and lived with it for many years.

Pretty much all of my memories of my grandad, minus any earlier photos are of him living with MS. Really you know no different when you are younger, and for my brother and me, this was normal. A more vivid and charming memory is how he would always have a tin of humbug sweets which we would help ourselves to whenever we visited him. 

I have always wanted to run a half marathon. Saying that I have always wanted to say I have completed a full marathon, but expectation and reality are worlds apart. A good, or not so good starting point was to sign up to a half marathon when on a sun lounger, with a cocktail, in Mexico and forced myself into training upon my return. I thought if I’m signed up, I’m committed, and I really was committed to raising as much money as possible in honour of my grandad and for such an amazing charity. 

The training was going well, it was hard and I was often faced with the mentality of “I’ll do it tomorrow”, but I was gradually getting my runs in and my miles up. Ultimately I wasn’t too fussed about hitting a certain time or pace, for me it was about the finish line, not finish time. My goal was to post as much as I could on social media, text as many people as I knew and keep sharing the event with as many people as possible. 

In October 2017, I ran, completed, and surprisingly didn’t pass out after my first half marathon. It was hard work! The atmosphere was amazing, and the supporters throughout the race were incredible, especially those handing out Jelly Babies! I hit a wall on the ninth mile but continued with some kind of walk/run. I thought of how proud my grandad would have been to have seen me, and to have known I was running for the charity. Not only that, but some people don’t have a choice in their abilities and limitations because of their health. I should be ecstatic that I have the ability to finish a race and for such a good cause! 

After the race, I said I wasn’t going to run another half marathon, but I would raise money for MS-UK in other ways. 

May 2019, I signed up for my second half marathon....! 

Same thoughts, same struggles, but through amazing friends and family and sponsorship I have been able to raise over £1,200 across both runs. I said I wouldn’t run another half marathon, but I guess I’ll be at the start line in 2020. Wish me luck! 

If you would like to donate to Lauren's amazing efforts, please visit www.justgiving.com/fundraising/lauren-chrimes2. Thank you! If you, like Lauren, want to take on a new challenge, call Lucy on 01206 226500 or email lucy@ms-uk.org

How I ran a marathon for MS-UK and my country

Posted on: December 10 2019

Chris Rayner turned his life around in his mid-30s and competed beyond his wildest dreams 

Watching athletics with my Dad when Seb Coe, Steve Ovett and Steve Cram flew the flag for our country is one of my earliest sporting memories. However, if you had told me back in 1983 that I would one day pull on my country’s colours in competition, I would have found that hard to believe. Skip forward to October 2019 and I found myself Chris Rayner - England.jpgproudly slipping into my England vest ahead of the Yorkshire Marathon!

The beginnings

During my early 30s, as is often the case, I’d put on a bit of weight and didn’t really exercise. I was stuck all day behind the wheel of a car as a sales rep, and my eating habits weren’t the best.

The big change happened when my marriage failed. I began jogging to try and do something positive. It’s well known that running can really boost mental health, and I was feeling a bit lonely. A friend suggested I go along with her to an event organised by Chiltern Runners. I became a regular.

I was adamant I would never enter a race, but one night, after several post-run beers, I was persuaded to enter the 2013 Leeds Abbey Dash 10k and, during the same beer session, declared I’d be able to do it in under 40 minutes. I didn’t even have a running watch back then so decided I’d better train hard, and crossed the finish line in 39 minutes 22 seconds. I was hooked!

The accident

The excitement of Leeds was short lived, however. A few days later I was in an awful car accident near Aberdeen which saw me upside down in a field. A week later my spleen ruptured, which resulted in major abdominal surgery to save my life. I felt lucky and so thankful to be alive and was desperate to get back to running to put events behind me. Six weeks after surgery and now minus my spleen, I cautiously took part in the South Manchester parkrun and it felt great to be back.

My first marathon

The next huge event in my running story was, again, after a few beers when I was persuaded to enter the 2016 Manchester Marathon. I woke the following morning thinking I’d made a terrible mistake, but then I promised myself I would dedicate the next three months to doing every single run on the plan, come rain, sun, snow or sleet.

I stood on the start line that sunny April morning knowing that I could not have done any more and that, whatever happened in the race, I had already achieved the real value the marathon. The icing on the cake was that after a rather frantic sprint to the finish line, my watch said 2 hours, 59 minutes and 57 seconds!

Going international

After that, there was no stopping me and I competed in the prestigious Boston Marathon, then Venice, then London, and then the Chester Marathon. I managed to finish in under 2 hours 45 minutes and, a week later, I received an email to say I’d qualified to represent England Masters in the 2019 Yorkshire Marathon!

My first charity marathon

It was going to be a proud day for me pulling on an England vest in my home county with my parents watching. I decided to use the occasion to do some good and considered running for charity, something I had not done previously. My grandfather Thomas Rayner had multiple sclerosis (MS) and died before I was born. I knew my father and uncle would be very delighted if I ran to support an MS charity and I chose MS-UK because of the fabulous support they provide to people living with the illness, including friends and work colleagues. Having set up a Just Giving page, I was amazed when £1,000 was donated in just 48 hours and £1,500 in total was pledged. I am fortunate to have some very generous friends and family.

The big day

The day itself was amazing. Lining up with my England colleagues for the team photo made it suddenly seem very real, but I quickly got my race head on as I had a job to do. I had my girlfriend and friends cheering me at the start and knew my parents would be at mile 14/15. Despite having had a few issues in training was determined to give it my all. 

Standing alongside my Chorlton team mate Matt in the start pen, we wished each other luck and waited for the off. The conditions were pretty good – dry, cool, but a bit windy in places. I went out hard in the early stages and waited for the wheels to fall off, but got to halfway feeling good.  

The shout of “Go on England!” from my mum gave me a boost at 15 miles, but a mile later, I started cramping a bit in my left hamstring. Fortunately, I managed to get rid of the cramp but lost touch with the group I had been running in, which meant running into the wind on my own, which is hard both physically and mentally. 

The marathon is a massive mental game – you have so much time out there where you need to maintain form and focus and also remain hard in the head. Fortunately, Yorkshire folk are famed for this! The last six miles are always a battle in every marathon – they often say it’s a 20 mile warm up for a six mile race. I kept thinking of the finish line, all the people who I knew would be tracking my progress, the people who had sponsored me, and I shut out the message from my body that was saying Stop!

Two miles to go and my pace had just dipped a touch between 20 and 24 miles, but I rallied myself and knew I had this race and another personal best was within my grasp. With half a mile to go, the organisers kindly put a short but sharp hill in your way, but you know when you crest it you have a 400 meter downhill run to the finish. My cheer squad was placed on that hill and I flew up it, then belted it down to the finish line as the commentator called my name over the public address. I crossed the line, arm aloft, in a new best of 2 hours, 40 minutes and 51 seconds.

It is only when you finish a marathon that you realise how much pain you are in and you go from sprinting to the line to suddenly finding it hard to walk! However, I am so lucky to be able to enjoy my sport and it serves as a great reminder that things I sometimes take for granted are not so easy for others. Whilst I am very proud of my progress from taking up running in my late 30s to running for England in my mid-40s, the amazing donations I raised for MS-UK was the something that meant the day was truly special.

A rainy Royal Parks Half Marathon doesn’t stop #TeamPurple!

Posted on: October 14 2019

On Sunday 13 October 2019 our Events Fundraiser Jenny supported the Royal Parks Half Marathon…Team Purple at the Royal Parks Half Marathon

We had an amazing team of 14 take on the Royal Parks Half Marathon this year. It was a muddy one! The rain during the night before made the start and finish line very muddy so our runners knew they were going to get very messy – if only you could run in wellington boots!

Despite the overcast, drizzly weather the team were in great spirits. They were supported by our cheer point of volunteers at mile 11, all of whom had taken part in running events before so they knew how to give that much needed encouragement. And of course, we kept up our reputation of being the noisiest cheer point on the route! I would like to say a massive thank you to all our supporters – it makes a huge difference!

I would also like to say a big congratulations to our #TeamPurple runners who have so far raised an epic £4,162.82, which is well over target, with more funds set to come in. Every penny goes towards supporting those affected by multiple sclerosis to live happier and healthier lives – thank you!

Have you been inspired by this event? MS-UK have places in the Vitality Big Half in London on the 02 March 2020. The minimum fundraising requirement or this event is £250.00. To register your interest call Jenny today on 01206 226500 or email jenny@ms-uk.org.

Running with a friend in mind…

Posted on: October 11 2019

In this guest blog, Shaun Collins tells us about why he has taken on not just one run in aid of MS-UK, but many! This weekend he will be joining #TeamPurple at the Royal Parks Half Marathon, here’s why…

My journey with MS-UK started in 2017 after my good friend Lewis Miller had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS).

After his diagnosis, Lewis had continued running marathons and around that time I had started running again. Whilst at that point I thought I’d be happy once I’d managed a 5k, I had always had the thought in my mind to run a marathon having grown up in London and I no longer really had an excuse. If Lewis could do it with what he was going through, what excuse did I have for not doing it!

Having made the decision, I went online to find an Autumn marathon and started by running the Birmingham Marathon in 2017. It didn’t go to plan, I hit the much talked about wall and walked most of the last 11 miles! 

I have since continued running and thanks to MS-UK, got a place to take part in the Virgin Money London Marathon in 2018 which really did fulfil a lifelong ambition and this time I managed to run the whole marathon which was my aim!

I have had a year off doing marathons due to the birth of our third child but decided I still needed to do something again so I chose to run the Great North Run and Royal Parks Half Marathons this year continuing to raise money for MS-UK!

The team at MS-UK, particularly Jenny, have been amazing and have been so supportive through every event I have done!

If you would like to sponsor me for my events this year, visit my JustGiving page

My work will match fund up to £1,000 so for every donation you give, the amount will be doubled!

I have plans to run three marathons in eight weeks next year so watch this space for more ways that you can support me and MS-UK!

 

Feeling inspired?

Join #TeamPurple at one of our 2020 events!

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Thank you to our #TeamPurple runners who took part in the Great North Run!

Posted on: September 09 2019

Photos of MS-UK runners at the Great North RunHi everyone,

On Sunday I had the privilege of cheering on our amazing #TeamPurple runners at the Simplyhealth Great North Run!

The weather was warm (if a little windy!) as I joined crowds of well over 200,000 people lining the route of the run, right from Newcastle to South Shields. Over the whole weekend around 58,000 people took part in events, from the 5k run through to the Great Tees 10k, but I was there to support the amazing runners taking on the Great North Run in aid of MS-UK.

This was the first year I have travelled North to support #TeamPurple at the Great North Run and I was amazed at the dedication and energy of our runners. It was a brilliant atmosphere and I would like to say a big thank you to everyone who wore our purple running vests with pride.

Photos of runners at Great North Run at end of the raceEvery penny raised from this event helps us support even more people across the whole of the UK who may be living with multiple sclerosis (MS). One service we offer is being able to listen to people’s worries and concerns through the MS-UK Helpline and offer lots of information and support at times when it is really needed. Our amazing fundraisers make this possible.

The date for next year is already out – 13 September 2020 – so if you want to join #TeamPurple please get in touch with me to register your interest. I would love to be cheering you across the finish line at this unforgettable event next year!

Best wishes,

Jenny

Events Fundraiser, MS-UK

Daughter 10 takes on triathlon

Posted on: August 06 2019

Lizzie Selby.jpgMummy hasn’t been very well recently, and she has had lots of symptoms like the ones people with multiple sclerosis (MS) get. After she found out more about MS, Mummy thought it would be a nice idea for me to fundraise, and we chose to fundraise for MS-UK.

I took part in the UK Kids Fun Triathlon York on Saturday 13 July. First, I had to swim 75 meters (three lengths of the pool), then I cycled 3km and finally, I ran 1,400 meters. This was the first triathlon I’ve ever done and it was lots of fun. I trained as hard as I could for it and everyone was so proud of me when I had finished. Mummy was with me on the day and she helped me a lot in the transition area.

Lizzie Selby raised £260 for MS-UK and every single penny will go towards helping those affected by MS. If you would like to do something to support MS-UK, then get in touch with Lucy today! Simply email Lucy@ms-uk.org or call 01206 226500.

Guest blog: 100 kilometres with family in mind

Posted on: July 31 2019

In this guest blog, Pete Ashton, 24 from Lincoln, describes completing the Action Peak District Challenge with two of his close friends all in aid of MS-UK...

Myself and two close friends completed the Action Peak District Challenge, a run covering 100 Kilometres (62.5 miles) 2450 metres of elevation (Ben Nevis is 1,354m). The route took us through a tough and varied figure of eight loop around Peak District National Park. With none of us having attempted a challenge anywhere near this distance, we were entering completely uncharted territory. However,18 hours 17 minutes and 41 seconds after departing Bakewell showground we crossed the finish line. Out of a field of over 600 runners, 508 completed the continuous challenge, we ended up finishing 68th.Photo of Pete with his friends at the finish line

My Mum and Uncle were diagnosed over 10 years ago and over this time I have watched how horrible multiple sclerosis (MS) can be. Over that time the treatments have got much better however the unpredictably of symptoms occurring has remained. When deciding to use this challenge to fundraise my first thought was to find a charity that helps people with MS.

Before this challenge I had never ran more than 15 miles. I had no idea how to train to run over 4 times that, and working away from home made training difficult at times. Before the challenge started I knew it was going to be more of a mental battle than a physical one, to mute that little voice telling you to give up.

Having completed the first 52Km with no major problems and feeling confident we headed off after grabbing some lunch feeling really optimistic. Almost immediately after setting off I hit my biggest obstacle. At the 54Km mark whilst descending a steep hill, I started to feel a shooting pain in my left knee, which as the miles went on got worse and worse. The pain and discomfort escalated and became a gruelling mental battle to carry on and at a prolonged slower pace. Dealing with the frustration of not being able to run and watching as people we had overtaken hours ago now overtaking us was hard to take, we had out worked them and a freak injury meant they were now in front. At the time it seemed very unfair. At that point I also felt a massive burden to the other two guys who could of carried on running. However later they too came up against their own injuries which together we worked through.

This was my first time fundraising. I have learnt a lot of lessons. Everything revolves around social media, get posts out often, start fundraising well in advance, Have information for how to donate on you at all times to give people, lots of times in conversation people expressed an interest in donating but I didn’t have the link at hand to give them.

I attempted this challenge predominantly for selfish reasons – I wanted to know if I could do it, if I could raise some money for a good cause at the same time that was a bonus. However the lessons I have learnt from the experience are far more than that of physical endurance.

The key take away lesson from this experience for me was that we always have more in the tank than we think, and it is often the support given from others which allowed us to see it. Me, Louis and Ryan were able to achieve as a collective something that would of been beyond us as individuals. And I think that really underpins the importance of the work done by charities like MS-UK, because that support really does make a monumental difference in what we can all achieve.

Want to take on your own challenge?

Get in touch! Call Lucy on 01206 226500 or email Lucy today.

Asics London 10k...a massive thank you to everyone involved!

Posted on: July 22 2019

We want to say a huge well done to everyone that took part...

On Sunday we had 30 people take on the ASICS London 10k in the bright and sunny London for MS-UK. Congratulations and thank you to all those that ran and came along to cheer and support, it goes so far in helping thoAsics London 10k runnersse affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) to live happier and healthier lives.

Part of our 30 racers was a running group from Berkshire, who was organised by a cherished long-term fundraiser who is affected by MS herself. Alongside many people who have taken part in the Asics London 10k previously, as they enjoyed it so much before!

Our team have been hosting their own events to help fundraise for this day, ranging from a gin tasting night, to a boot camp and even a rock and roll bingo night!

We had a very enthusiastic cheer point of volunteers who came along to support #TeamPurple at this event in London, most of who had either volunteered before or had taken part in our other events. We are so immensely grateful for this support and just can’t do these events without you, so we wanted to give a massive thank you!

Here is what Chris and Fran Setterfield, two of our amazing volunteers, had to say about the day…

'We love supporting our runners at the cheer points. Seeing the unexpected smiles on their faces when they suddenly hear their names being called out means so much to them! We know how important this is, having been at the receiving end!'

Deb Wald, who ran the race itself, said 'I’m so happy to have taken part and done it again for MS-UK, there’s a continuity with them that’s very motivating.'

Has this inspired you to run for MS-UK?

Places are still available in the Royal Parks Half Marathon

Email Jenny today to find out more or call us on 01206 226500!

MS-UK runners at Asics London 10k 2019
Deb and Anne, MS-UK runners

 

 

 

Guest blog: My marathon packing checklist

Posted on: July 01 2019

Photo of Jenny Brown from Hobby HelpIf you are going to be taking on your first ever marathon in the near future, we have you covered. In this guest blog, Jenny Brown shares her top tips for marathon packing...

After logging thousands of miles over the past decade, I’ve consulted my running journals, reflected on my best and worst races, and compiled the information I wish had been available to me before running my first 26.2.

If you’re a little (or a lot!) apprehensive about running your first marathon, the following information is sure to help you feel prepared and more confident.

You can read my full blog ‘The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide to Running your First Marathon’ on the hobby help website today.

Marathon packing checklist

  • Running shoes
  • Running socks (avoid cotton)
  • Running shorts, cropped pants, or tights
  • Sports bra
  • Moisture-wicking tank or tee
  • For cold temperatures: Jacket and/or arm warmers
  • Throwaway gear (long sleeve shirt, pants, hat, and/or gloves you don’t mind ditching before the race. These items are typically donated to charity)
  • Bag to hold gear
  • Bib (filled out) & safety pins
  • Timing chip
  • Race information (address, directions, start time, etc.)
  • Driver’s license or other identification
  • Cash (bills are best)
  • Cellphone
  • Running belt
  • Water bottles (filled)
  • Headphones
  • GPS watch
  • Lip balm (preferably with sunscreen)
  • Medications, including pain reliever
  • Fuel (gel, chews, candy, etc.)
  • Hair ties/hat/visor
  • Sunglasses
  • Sunscreen
  • Post-race outfit to change into
  • Post-race food and drinks
  • Towel
  • For cold temperatures: A blanket, coat, hat, and gloves
  • Anti-chafing stick or Vaseline
  • Tissues
  • Bandages
  • Shoes and socks to change into
  • Wet wipes
  • Cellphone charger

Feeling inspired to run?

Find out more about running the Virgin Money London Marathon 2020 in aid of MS-UK.

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