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Well done to our Vitality Big Half runners!

Posted on: March 02 2020

Vitality Big Half MSUK-38.jpgYesterday, Sunday 01 March, 21 members of #TeamPurple took part in London’s Vitality Big Half Marathon. Runners gathered from all over the country to put themselves to the test and achieve their fundraising goals for MS-UK. Some even used this as a warm-up to the Virgin Money London Marathon, which will take place in April, and others did it just for fun!

The course started at London’s iconic Tower Hill and finished at the famous Cutty Sark. Once participants had successfully completed the half marathon they were invited to enjoy a festival put on by the event organisers. It boasted live music, street food and lots of fun for all of the family to enjoy.

Although there was the threat of storm Jorge the day turned out to be bright with blue skies and a brisk breeze, which definitely didn’t stop friends and family lining the course to cheer their loved ones on. Along the course, there was live music, including choirs and bands playing from different venues creating an amazing atmosphere.

Our cheer point in Rotherhithe was manged by our wonderful volunteers who shouted loud and proud for #TeamPurple. A big thank you to all of you, we just couldn’t deliver our #TeamPurple spirit without your brilliant support!

Those who have been fundraising for the event have so far raised £2,050 which is the equivalent of MS-UK being able to provide 41 counselling sessions to those affected by multiple sclerosis, so you really are making a difference. Thank you all for your amazing efforts!

We would also like to say a special thank you to Jonathan Dadds for his fantastic photography.  

Feeling inspired to take on a half marathon? MS-UK has places in two events later in the year, the Great North Run and Royal Parks Half Marathon. For more information, call Jenny on 01206 226500.

For those of you who didn't 'Meet the Experts', Jenny our Events Fundraiser fills you in

Posted on: February 14 2020

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If you didn’t attend the Virgin Money London Marathon ‘Meet the Experts’ event, our Events Fundraiser Jenny Poulter reveals you what you missed

On Saturday, Lucy and I went down to the Meet the Experts event organised by the Virgin Money London Marathon events team.

The day was broken into two-time slots with sessions in the morning and afternoon covering training, nutrition, fundraising and more. There was then a chance to visit the charities that had attended, have a sports massage, have your gait measured by New Balance and buy some new running gear! To see more on what was covered, visit www.virginmoneylondonmarathon.com/en-gb/event-info/meet-experts/.

It was also a great way to meet some of our #TeamPurple runners and catch up with you about your preparations for the big day.

Some of the points Lucy and I took from the talks were

Sustainability

The Virgin Money London Marathon is working really hard to become as sustainable as possible, and here are a few ways in which they are doing this.

  • Running numbers will now be printed on collection at the Virgin Money London Marathon Running Show, rather than being pre-printed
  • You will collect your post-race food at the Virgin Money London Marathon Running Show, rather than at the finish line of the race
  • Bottles on the course are 100% recyclable
  • There will be two stations of seaweed pods – Lucy and I tried one at the event and would recommend if you get the chance before the day to do the same to practice

Fundraising

  • Aim high, set your target higher and you will find it easier to reach your minimum sponsorship amount
  • It’s not just about reaching the minimum fundraising target, it's about challenging yourself to do amazing things
  • Be inspired by others around you and be proud of what you are doing
  • Get to know your charity so that you can confidently talk to people about the cause you are supporting

 

We’re hoping to get hold of the slides that were shown on the day to share with you all too. If you haven’t yet seen this video do take a look www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGBANm2xlhs – you will be part of this amazing event sharing its amazing milestone! It really will be one of the greatest days of your life!

Don’t forget we are on the end of the phone, so if you need any support from us just call us on 01206 226500.

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Guest Blog - 'Through my running and raising money for MS-UK I feel that I can make a difference'

Posted on: February 12 2020

A Rosenberg.pngVirgin Money London Marathon runner Alison Rosenberg shares her journey

I started running later in life, my challenge just prior to my 40th birthday was to be able to run a 5km park run without stopping! I completed a ‘walk to run’ course with Chase Life UK then proceeded to regularly take part in park runs, 10KM races and eventually a half marathon.

Early on in 2019 a very close friend was hospitalised with what was a severe acute episode, an Multiple Sclerosis (MS) diagnosis followed. My friend received this diagnosis and to be honest, none of my friends fully understood what MS meant or how it affects the individual, family and friends.

So, after three years of running I had thought about maybe taking part in a marathon but had never really had the time or motivation to commit myself to the training. I attended the Virgin Money London Marathon in 2019 as a spectator and on that day, I decided that it was my time to apply! My friend has had to deal with so much and I wanted to show my love and support by raising money for MS-UK. I mean, what better motivation is there, than to run for one of my greatest friends in the iconic London Marathon!

As soon as I was offered a place to run London, I started my fundraising. Initially my head was just full of ideas! I could barely sleep with the mix of excitement and nerves all at the same time! I found it useful to sit and write all my ideas down and to talk to friends about which ideas were the most practical and realistic.

Firstly, I set up my Just Giving page followed by my London Marathon Facebook page. Facebook has been a valuable tool for me to advertise my fundraising events and update my followers with my achievements.

Fundraising has been a challenge, but enjoyable and rewarding at the same time! Here are some of the main ideas that have helped me reach my initial target

  • Diary dates (raffle)

I sold every date of the year for £2 each, with a great 1st, 2nd and 3rd cash prize!

  • Body Shop and goodies hamper

My friend has an online Body Shop products page, she supported me with making a marvellous hamper. It had around £75 worth of products and goodies, including Pizza vouchers kindly donated by Domino’s. I attended a couple of Autumn Fayres with the hamper followed by a Body Shop party hosted by a friendA Rosenberg 4_0.png

  • Cake break

I arranged three separate cake breaks at work. I was very busy making cakes, but my work, family and friends all supported me and baked cakes too! These cakes breaks to my colleagues raised £250

  • Dog hamper raffle

I emailed and telephoned many companies to do with dogs and dog walking! I was totally blown away with the generosity of both small and large companies who donated over £500 worth of products to me. I have two Labradors myself, which only added to the excitement of the wonderful prizes on offer and I was able to share this with all my fellow dog walking friends!

  • “Guess how many sweets are in the bouquet"

A local sweet shop kindly donated a sweet bouquet worth £22. The owner of the shop counted the sweets and wrote the answer in a card for me so that nobody else knew the answer!

 

I have emailed and telephoned several companies over the last few months, asking if they would consider donating to my London Marathon fundraiser for MS-UK. Many companies have emailed back to explain that they are unable to support me due to other charitable works, however others have supported me with wonderful donations. I have been so grateful for each one of my donations, however big or small, each one has helped me push forward with my target.

At just £106 away from my £2,000 target I received a message from a local accounting company to inform me that they would like to donate the remaining money to get me to my target. I was overwhelmed and very happy to meet with one of the Directors to collect the cheque.

Since reaching target I have continued with my fundraising ideas and have received further items from larger brand companies. I am busy planning my final event which will take place in March, a craft and products sale at our local social club. I have organised for people to come and buy a table to be able to sell their products, while I will be running a Tombola and “Name the teddy” stall.

A Rosenberg 2.pngI am the type of person that likes to feel that I can be of some help, to try to make a difference. Through my running and raising money for MS-UK I feel that I can make a difference for my friend - along with many more individuals and families.

To date, I am at the 15-mile mark with my training, this is a huge personal achievement, but I know I still have a long way to go! My running friends have all signed up to the Virgin Money London Marathon as well. All 10 of us are training together and raising money for charity. My friend Rachel is running alongside me for MS-UK and is keeping very busy with her own fundraisers! We are all excited and nervous for race day, but between us we know we will make it and in the process, raise as much money for charity as possible!

If you would like to support Alison and follow her on her journey to the Virgin Money London Marathon, you can donate to her Justgiving page below

www.justgiving.com/fundraising/alison-rosenberg

"Running helps me beat fatigue"

Posted on: January 30 2020

JM-SM-Dubai.jpgJohn Mills tells us about his marathon motivation and how training helps him manage his MS

Here’s a quick introduction for those of you that don’t know me. My name’s John Mills and I’m going to be running the London Marathon for MS-UK this year.

I was delighted to be asked to blog on the run-up to the big race by the team at MS-UK. It’s a cause that’s very personal to me. The year 2017 was one of big changes. My wife gave birth to our beautiful daughter, I turned 30, and I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS).

In this blog, and further forthcoming ones, I will write about my journey and progress from the perspective of a runner, how my training is progressing and how my MS is in relation to this.

My motivation

I tried my hardest for over a year to ignore my diagnosis. I didn’t want MS to define who I was but, with the help of MS-UK, I have now realised that I can help define the condition instead, by raising awareness and promoting the fantastic work that MS-UK do.

Having already started fundraising, raising over £2,000 in a month, and meeting 20 or so #TeamPurple runners at a recent event means that there is now no turning back for me!

I am using the Nike Running Club (NRC) app for no other reason really than I have had it since 2013 and I know what to expect when using its training plans.

Royal Parks run

To get me off to the best start possible, I signed up for the Royal Parks Half Marathon. I am so pleased that I did. More than anything, I learnt what to expect come the 26 April 2020.

Here is what I took away from the day.

1. As silly as it sounds, 16,000 people is a lot to get across the start (and finish) line and that number will be doubled come April, which feels a little overwhelming. 

2. Headphones are not needed. You won’t need headphones come race day (for training they are a must, for me anyway) as there is so much more going on to keep you occupied other than a playlist; the sights of London, steel bands, marching bands and the incredible support. It’s amazing that someone who you have never met before shouting your name can put a smile on your face after just having ran 13 miles!

3. Try to at least roughly plan where your supporters will be beforehand as you will undoubtedly miss them, as I did, if you don’t know where they are. My first recommendation to anybody running the marathon for the first time is to try and get some race day experience so you know what to expect.  

My wife Sasha and I ran the Colchester half marathon for the MS Society back in 2016 because someone Sasha knows had been diagnosed with MS earlier that year. We raised £1,800 and, ironically, I had no idea that just a year later I’d be diagnosed myself.

Meditation

I’ve always enjoyed running, but even more so now, as for me it is a form of meditation. All I need to think about is putting one foot in front of the other – nothing else matters. You are only competing against yourself. I wanted to act now with regards to running a marathon because with MS you just don’t know if or when it will have a greater impact on your everyday life. MSUK royal parks half 2019-9.JPG

Running and, more specifically, training for the Royal Parks half marathon and now the London marathon is part of my daily routine. It may sound odd, but if I wasn’t running, fatigue would get the better of me and I would spend the rest of the day in bed.

Today is a perfect example of that. I find maintaining a routine is key and exercise forms a strong part of that. I’m told that there is science behind that, but I am by no means an expert. All I know is that it helps me.

My motivation

Training for the marathon is a great incentive for me to get out and maintain a certain level of fitness. After a run I get a sense of accomplishment and feel like I am beating MS one day at a time.

Currently I am not on any disease-modifying therapy for my MS, but I am due to start Ocrevus which works perfectly around training as it’s a six-monthly infusion. I take it as a sign that I am supposed to be running this marathon.

To sponsor John, visit his JustGiving page https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/john-mills-msmyselfandi

Fundraiser of the Month: Lisa Addie shares her #TeamPurple marathon story

Posted on: January 16 2020

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As soon as I found out I had a place on #TeamPurple in the Virgin Money London Marathon 2020, I started telling everyone, and I mean everyone!

Setting up a JustGiving page makes sharing your fundraising story so easy. As soon as I had mine set up, I shared the link with friends, family, work colleagues, clients and suppliers at work, even the WhatsApp group that all the neighbours in my building are part of.

Spreading the excitement

Being passionate and truly caring about the cause you are running for is infectious. People feel it and get behind you because of it. Don’t worry about boring people, or get wrapped up in what they think about what you’re doing, as that’s not a productive use of your time and energy.

As well as donations from friends and family, I sold teams on a football scratch card. If you search ‘football scratch card’ on Amazon you can buy a pack of 10 for £3. I sold each team for £10, with £200 to go to the winner and £200 for MS-UK. I timed it to be drawn just before Christmas which I think helped get the squares sold. I’ll definitely be doing another card pre-race day.

I have also been in touch with my local community manager at Tesco to organise bag packing. I’ll be pushing for Easter weekend so that the shop will be a bit busier, and it’s not long before the race itself! I have linked up with a couple of other runners near me so that we can take this on together and have more of a presence in-store.

Running for my mum

My mum had secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Her left leg was worst affected, making walking a daily struggle.

She would often fall in public and be left humiliated and, of course, in pain. crop_0.png

In September 2013, she was admitted to hospital for an unrelated skin infection. On discharge she was largely bed bound as her MS became increasingly aggressive, spurred on by a weakened immune system. A combination of all of the above led to her suffering a pulmonary embolism and passing away on 26/09/13. I don’t need to tell anyone how hard losing a parent is. I am completely and utterly lost without my mum and, even six years on, it’s as rubbish as it was then!

I was too young, selfish and naïve to take control of the situation for mum. I want to run the London 2020 Marathon in memory of her and to raise funds for MS UK to be able to help others with MS because of this. MS is misunderstood, it affects everyone differently and is completely unpredictable. I want to play my part in changing this.

My top tips

If you’re training for a big run, get started on your fundraising as soon as you can so you can smash it out of the park early and focus on training

Talk to everyone about it. It will connect you with people in a way you would never have imagined.

Use social media. I’m documenting my training on Instagram (@healthylivinglisa_). It’s an amazing tool to get chatting to other runners and widen your network even further.

Get yourself into the Facebook group and connect with other MS-UK runners. There are also a few London Marathon Facebook groups with thousands of people to chat to and get tips from. 1_2.jpg

Not everyone has this opportunity, certainly not those that are badly affected with MS, so it’s important to recognise how much of a privilege we all have to be part of #TeamPurple and what an honour it is to spread awareness and take this challenge on.

Fundraiser of the Month: “I said I wouldn’t run another half marathon…”

Posted on: December 16 2019

Grandad.jpgWhen you think you won't get the fundraising bug and you do... Lauren Chrimes does it for grandad!

I began fundraising for MS-UK back in 2017. It was an obvious choice of charity as my grandad was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) when he was younger and lived with it for many years.

Pretty much all of my memories of my grandad, minus any earlier photos are of him living with MS. Really you know no different when you are younger, and for my brother and me, this was normal. A more vivid and charming memory is how he would always have a tin of humbug sweets which we would help ourselves to whenever we visited him. 

I have always wanted to run a half marathon. Saying that I have always wanted to say I have completed a full marathon, but expectation and reality are worlds apart. A good, or not so good starting point was to sign up to a half marathon when on a sun lounger, with a cocktail, in Mexico and forced myself into training upon my return. I thought if I’m signed up, I’m committed, and I really was committed to raising as much money as possible in honour of my grandad and for such an amazing charity. 

The training was going well, it was hard and I was often faced with the mentality of “I’ll do it tomorrow”, but I was gradually getting my runs in and my miles up. Ultimately I wasn’t too fussed about hitting a certain time or pace, for me it was about the finish line, not finish time. My goal was to post as much as I could on social media, text as many people as I knew and keep sharing the event with as many people as possible. 

In October 2017, I ran, completed, and surprisingly didn’t pass out after my first half marathon. It was hard work! The atmosphere was amazing, and the supporters throughout the race were incredible, especially those handing out Jelly Babies! I hit a wall on the ninth mile but continued with some kind of walk/run. I thought of how proud my grandad would have been to have seen me, and to have known I was running for the charity. Not only that, but some people don’t have a choice in their abilities and limitations because of their health. I should be ecstatic that I have the ability to finish a race and for such a good cause! 

After the race, I said I wasn’t going to run another half marathon, but I would raise money for MS-UK in other ways. 

May 2019, I signed up for my second half marathon....! 

Same thoughts, same struggles, but through amazing friends and family and sponsorship I have been able to raise over £1,200 across both runs. I said I wouldn’t run another half marathon, but I guess I’ll be at the start line in 2020. Wish me luck! 

If you would like to donate to Lauren's amazing efforts, please visit www.justgiving.com/fundraising/lauren-chrimes2. Thank you! If you, like Lauren, want to take on a new challenge, call Lucy on 01206 226500 or email lucy@ms-uk.org

How I ran a marathon for MS-UK and my country

Posted on: December 10 2019

Chris Rayner turned his life around in his mid-30s and competed beyond his wildest dreams 

Watching athletics with my Dad when Seb Coe, Steve Ovett and Steve Cram flew the flag for our country is one of my earliest sporting memories. However, if you had told me back in 1983 that I would one day pull on my country’s colours in competition, I would have found that hard to believe. Skip forward to October 2019 and I found myself Chris Rayner - England.jpgproudly slipping into my England vest ahead of the Yorkshire Marathon!

The beginnings

During my early 30s, as is often the case, I’d put on a bit of weight and didn’t really exercise. I was stuck all day behind the wheel of a car as a sales rep, and my eating habits weren’t the best.

The big change happened when my marriage failed. I began jogging to try and do something positive. It’s well known that running can really boost mental health, and I was feeling a bit lonely. A friend suggested I go along with her to an event organised by Chorlton Runners. I became a regular.

I was adamant I would never enter a race, but one night, after several post-run beers, I was persuaded to enter the 2013 Leeds Abbey Dash 10k and, during the same beer session, declared I’d be able to do it in under 40 minutes. I didn’t even have a running watch back then so decided I’d better train hard, and crossed the finish line in 39 minutes 22 seconds. I was hooked!

The accident

The excitement of Leeds was short lived, however. A few days later I was in an awful car accident near Aberdeen which saw me upside down in a field. A week later my spleen ruptured, which resulted in major abdominal surgery to save my life. I felt lucky and so thankful to be alive and was desperate to get back to running to put events behind me. Six weeks after surgery and now minus my spleen, I cautiously took part in the South Manchester parkrun and it felt great to be back.

My first marathon

The next huge event in my running story was, again, after a few beers when I was persuaded to enter the 2016 Manchester Marathon. I woke the following morning thinking I’d made a terrible mistake, but then I promised myself I would dedicate the next three months to doing every single run on the plan, come rain, sun, snow or sleet.

I stood on the start line that sunny April morning knowing that I could not have done any more and that, whatever happened in the race, I had already achieved the real value the marathon. The icing on the cake was that after a rather frantic sprint to the finish line, my watch said 2 hours, 59 minutes and 57 seconds!

Going international

After that, there was no stopping me and I competed in the prestigious Boston Marathon, then Venice, then London, and then the Chester Marathon. I managed to finish in under 2 hours 45 minutes and, a week later, I received an email to say I’d qualified to represent England Masters in the 2019 Yorkshire Marathon!

My first charity marathon

It was going to be a proud day for me pulling on an England vest in my home county with my parents watching. I decided to use the occasion to do some good and considered running for charity, something I had not done previously. My grandfather Thomas Rayner had multiple sclerosis (MS) and died before I was born. I knew my father and uncle would be very delighted if I ran to support an MS charity and I chose MS-UK because of the fabulous support they provide to people living with the illness, including friends and work colleagues. Having set up a Just Giving page, I was amazed when £1,000 was donated in just 48 hours and £1,500 in total was pledged. I am fortunate to have some very generous friends and family.

The big day

The day itself was amazing. Lining up with my England colleagues for the team photo made it suddenly seem very real, but I quickly got my race head on as I had a job to do. I had my girlfriend and friends cheering me at the start and knew my parents would be at mile 14/15. Despite having had a few issues in training was determined to give it my all. 

Standing alongside my Chorlton team mate Matt in the start pen, we wished each other luck and waited for the off. The conditions were pretty good – dry, cool, but a bit windy in places. I went out hard in the early stages and waited for the wheels to fall off, but got to halfway feeling good.  

The shout of “Go on England!” from my mum gave me a boost at 15 miles, but a mile later, I started cramping a bit in my left hamstring. Fortunately, I managed to get rid of the cramp but lost touch with the group I had been running in, which meant running into the wind on my own, which is hard both physically and mentally. 

The marathon is a massive mental game – you have so much time out there where you need to maintain form and focus and also remain hard in the head. Fortunately, Yorkshire folk are famed for this! The last six miles are always a battle in every marathon – they often say it’s a 20 mile warm up for a six mile race. I kept thinking of the finish line, all the people who I knew would be tracking my progress, the people who had sponsored me, and I shut out the message from my body that was saying Stop!

Two miles to go and my pace had just dipped a touch between 20 and 24 miles, but I rallied myself and knew I had this race and another personal best was within my grasp. With half a mile to go, the organisers kindly put a short but sharp hill in your way, but you know when you crest it you have a 400 meter downhill run to the finish. My cheer squad was placed on that hill and I flew up it, then belted it down to the finish line as the commentator called my name over the public address. I crossed the line, arm aloft, in a new best of 2 hours, 40 minutes and 51 seconds.

It is only when you finish a marathon that you realise how much pain you are in and you go from sprinting to the line to suddenly finding it hard to walk! However, I am so lucky to be able to enjoy my sport and it serves as a great reminder that things I sometimes take for granted are not so easy for others. Whilst I am very proud of my progress from taking up running in my late 30s to running for England in my mid-40s, the amazing donations I raised for MS-UK was the something that meant the day was truly special.

A rainy Royal Parks Half Marathon doesn’t stop #TeamPurple!

Posted on: October 14 2019

On Sunday 13 October 2019 our Events Fundraiser Jenny supported the Royal Parks Half Marathon…Team Purple at the Royal Parks Half Marathon

We had an amazing team of 14 take on the Royal Parks Half Marathon this year. It was a muddy one! The rain during the night before made the start and finish line very muddy so our runners knew they were going to get very messy – if only you could run in wellington boots!

Despite the overcast, drizzly weather the team were in great spirits. They were supported by our cheer point of volunteers at mile 11, all of whom had taken part in running events before so they knew how to give that much needed encouragement. And of course, we kept up our reputation of being the noisiest cheer point on the route! I would like to say a massive thank you to all our supporters – it makes a huge difference!

I would also like to say a big congratulations to our #TeamPurple runners who have so far raised an epic £4,162.82, which is well over target, with more funds set to come in. Every penny goes towards supporting those affected by multiple sclerosis to live happier and healthier lives – thank you!

Have you been inspired by this event? MS-UK have places in the Vitality Big Half in London on the 02 March 2020. The minimum fundraising requirement or this event is £250.00. To register your interest call Jenny today on 01206 226500 or email jenny@ms-uk.org.

Running with a friend in mind…

Posted on: October 11 2019

In this guest blog, Shaun Collins tells us about why he has taken on not just one run in aid of MS-UK, but many! This weekend he will be joining #TeamPurple at the Royal Parks Half Marathon, here’s why…

My journey with MS-UK started in 2017 after my good friend Lewis Miller had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS).

After his diagnosis, Lewis had continued running marathons and around that time I had started running again. Whilst at that point I thought I’d be happy once I’d managed a 5k, I had always had the thought in my mind to run a marathon having grown up in London and I no longer really had an excuse. If Lewis could do it with what he was going through, what excuse did I have for not doing it!

Having made the decision, I went online to find an Autumn marathon and started by running the Birmingham Marathon in 2017. It didn’t go to plan, I hit the much talked about wall and walked most of the last 11 miles! 

I have since continued running and thanks to MS-UK, got a place to take part in the Virgin Money London Marathon in 2018 which really did fulfil a lifelong ambition and this time I managed to run the whole marathon which was my aim!

I have had a year off doing marathons due to the birth of our third child but decided I still needed to do something again so I chose to run the Great North Run and Royal Parks Half Marathons this year continuing to raise money for MS-UK!

The team at MS-UK, particularly Jenny, have been amazing and have been so supportive through every event I have done!

If you would like to sponsor me for my events this year, visit my JustGiving page

My work will match fund up to £1,000 so for every donation you give, the amount will be doubled!

I have plans to run three marathons in eight weeks next year so watch this space for more ways that you can support me and MS-UK!

 

Feeling inspired?

Join #TeamPurple at one of our 2020 events!

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Thank you to our #TeamPurple runners who took part in the Great North Run!

Posted on: September 09 2019

Photos of MS-UK runners at the Great North RunHi everyone,

On Sunday I had the privilege of cheering on our amazing #TeamPurple runners at the Simplyhealth Great North Run!

The weather was warm (if a little windy!) as I joined crowds of well over 200,000 people lining the route of the run, right from Newcastle to South Shields. Over the whole weekend around 58,000 people took part in events, from the 5k run through to the Great Tees 10k, but I was there to support the amazing runners taking on the Great North Run in aid of MS-UK.

This was the first year I have travelled North to support #TeamPurple at the Great North Run and I was amazed at the dedication and energy of our runners. It was a brilliant atmosphere and I would like to say a big thank you to everyone who wore our purple running vests with pride.

Photos of runners at Great North Run at end of the raceEvery penny raised from this event helps us support even more people across the whole of the UK who may be living with multiple sclerosis (MS). One service we offer is being able to listen to people’s worries and concerns through the MS-UK Helpline and offer lots of information and support at times when it is really needed. Our amazing fundraisers make this possible.

The date for next year is already out – 13 September 2020 – so if you want to join #TeamPurple please get in touch with me to register your interest. I would love to be cheering you across the finish line at this unforgettable event next year!

Best wishes,

Jenny

Events Fundraiser, MS-UK

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