Skip to main content

New Pathways issue 108 is out now!

Posted on: April 06 2018

Hi everyone,Front cover of New Pathways

I am pleased to say New Pathways issue 108 is now landing on doormats across the country! As always we have a packed issue, full of all the latest multiple sclerosis (MS) news and research, including drug updates and the latest cannabis study findings. 

As the sunshine begins to make an appearance, we get topical with lots on vitamin D. MSer Ian Cook puts vitamin D tablets and sprays to the test (see page 30) and Kahn Johnson reveals what happened when his vitamin D levels became toxic on page 16. 

Also in this issue, MS Nurse Miranda Olding discusses sexual dsyfunction and what can be done to help (page 14) and we have the big interview with the star of Channel 4 programme 'The Search for a Miracle Cure' Mark Lewis (page 24). 

I hope you enjoy reading this issue, and please do email me your comments and letters to newpathways@ms-uk.org.

Best wishes,

Sarah-Jane

Editor, New Pathways

P.S. Don't forget New Pathways is available to read on the go. Download the My MS-UK app from the App store on your phone or tablet device today!

HSCT the truth

Posted on: March 29 2018

On 19 March, BBC Breakfast featured a short piece on a HSCT trial with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients taking place in Sheffield. It provoked a strong reaction from the MS community and a lot of questions, so we’ve tried to answer some of them…SJL.png

What is it and how does it work?
A variety of clinics and hospitals across the world, including Sheffield and London are trialling and practicing HSCT treatment.

This particular Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) trial, which has been taking place in Sheffield, America, Sweden and Brazil, involves the patient having stem cells extracted from their bone marrow. Next they are given chemotherapy treatment, which strips back their immune system to almost that of a baby and then the healthy stem cells are transplanted back into their body.

The trial was set up to test the efficacy of HSCT treatment versus FDA approved MS drugs, such as interferon, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod, or tecfidera.

The findings
Just over 100 patients have taken part in the trial, in hospitals in Chicago, Sheffield, Uppsala in Sweden and Sao Paulo in Brazil.

Scientists conducting the research claim they have made a significant breakthrough with this type of treatment in patients with highly active relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS).

Patients received either HSCT or drug treatment. After one year, only one relapse occurred among the stem cell group compared with 39 in the drug group.

After an average follow-up of three years, the transplants had failed in three out of 52 patients (6%), compared with 30 of 50 (60%) in the control group.

Those in the transplant group experienced a reduction in disability, whereas symptoms worsened in the drug group.

The interim results were released at the annual meeting of the European Society for Bone and Marrow Transplantation in Lisbon.

Click here to read the study’s abstract - Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Patients With Inflammatory Multiple Sclerosis Failing Alternate Approved Therapy: A Randomized Study.

What is the inclusion criteria?
Participants have to be aged 18-55 and have a clinically defined MS diagnosis using the revised McDonald criteria.

Their Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) should be 2.0 to 6.0.

The must show inflammatory disease despite treatment with standard disease modifying therapy, including at least six months of interferon or copaxone.

Inflammatory disease is defined based on both MRI (gadolinium enhancing lesions) and clinical activity (acute relapses *treated with IV or oral high dose corticosteroids and prescribed by a neurologist). Minimum disease activity required for failure is defined as: a) two or more *steroid treated clinical relapses with documented new objective signs on neurological examination documented by a neurologist within the year prior to the study, or b) one *steroid treated clinical relapse within the year prior to study and evidence on MRI of active inflammation (i.e., gadolinium enhancement) within the last 12 months on an occasion separate from the clinical relapse (three months before or after the clinical relapse).

A steroid treated relapse will include a relapse that was severe enough to justify treatment but due to patient intolerance of steroids, or a history of non-response to steroids, they were offered but not used.

More information about inclusion and exclusion criteria can be found here.

Can I get on the trial?

Unfortunately you cannot. This is because although the trial is still active they are not recruiting.

Will it really be available on the NHS within a few months?
Dr Susan Kohlhaas, director of research at the MS Society, said the stem cell transplant HSCT "will soon be recognised as an established treatment in England”, but will it?
While this is a phase III trial testing the efficacy of the HSCT, which will be incredibly significant when it comes to gaining licensing approval, the treatment has only been formally assessed for use in the NHS within clinical trials.

There will also be a few more hoops to jump through, such as gaining approval from NICE (The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence). Although NICE does now have a fast track criteria, which enables certain drugs and treatments with the right evidence to pass through the system much quicker than we have seen in the past. Cost will almost definitely be a deciding factor. HSCT comes with a price tag of £30,000, but there are already some approved DMTs with a similar costing available to patients, so this could help justify the expenditure, especially if the treatment can halt the MS for a long period of time. We should also be mindful that a higher price point can often lead to drugs and treatments being allocated to minorities with strict criteria, rather than being rolled out for everyone.

When does the trial end?
The trial is still ongoing and its estimated end date is December 2018.

Is it really a “game changer”?
Well, it’s a great step forward for people with RRMS and it does mean there is a potential highly-successful treatment that could halt MS in its tracks on the horizon.
However, HSCT treatment in secondary and primary progressive patients doesn’t tend to be as effective and you tend to see less improvement in disability because the nerve damage by this point has become permanent.

There are still a number of questions we do not have the answer to, such as how long does the treatment last?

But maybe the biggest questions of all is if MS is genetic, the person will still have the same gene and what’s to stop the gene being triggered again and the MS returning if we do not know the true cause?

Carers Week: 'You know you’re not the first person to go through this, but it can feel that way'

Posted on: June 14 2017

As part of Carers Week Mark gives his account of caring for his wife, Portia with multiple sclerosis...

mark_brightburn_sm.jpgPortia and I met at university, where we were studying architecture and landscape architecture. We were married in 1998 – around the same time Portia was diagnosed with MS.

You can’t anticipate what a progressive condition such as MS will be like. It’s different for everyone. We have had long periods of managing fairly well – including having our three children who are now aged 15, 12 and 10 years old.

There have also been periods of relapse. Day to day you don’t really notice the changes, but you look back over the years and can see how the condition has developed. 2014 was a particularly bad year, Portia spent a lot of time in hospital and we had the shock of finding out she had also developed epilepsy. It was a steep learning curve.

I’m an architect, and while my workplace has been very good at supporting me there have been difficult, uncertain times – especially when I’ve had to have unplanned time off while Portia has been in hospital. You know you’re not the first person to go through this, but it can feel that way.

Last year I set up a Carers’ Network at work which now has 150 members – including people who are caring now or have in the past, as well as people preparing for what could happen in the future. The best thing has been the opportunity to share our experiences and pool our knowledge. There’s always someone you can ask ‘How did you find this?’, ‘What can I do in this situation?’.

Portia and I are a great team, and we’ve always found a way round any challenge we’ve been faced with. Portia loves learning and is currently part way through an Open University course in Psychology and is training as an Art Therapist. MS may make the practicalities more difficult, but it doesn’t stop you living your life.

Celebrate Carers Week
This week is Carers Week. The annual awareness campaign celebrates and recognise the vital contribution made by the UK’s 6.5 million unpaid carers. The aim is to build carer friendly communities, places where carers are supported to look after their loved ones well, while being recognised as individuals with needs of their own.

Carers Week is a time of intensive local activity with thousands of events planned for carers across the UK. If you’re looking after someone, make sure you find out about the help and support available at www.carersuk.org.

For more information on providing care and getting the right support, read our 2-page feature in issue 103 of New Pathways magazine.

Do you live in Essex? Vote for us!

Posted on: May 26 2017

fundraising-team.jpgHello everyone!

We wanted to let you all know about an opportunity for MS-UK that we didn’t want to miss!

We are hoping to be TSB Colchester’s charity of the year, and this is where we need your help. Selections will be made on how many nominations the charity gets from the public. Please take a moment for vote for us and ask friends and family to vote too!

Nominate MS-UK today using the online TSB form!

Some information that may be useful for the form:

  • Our charity registration number is 1033731
  • Our email address is Jill@ms-uk.org and the best person to contact here is Jill Purcell
  • The question about what the organisation does has a 255 character limit
  • The postcode of the charity is CO2 8JF…please choose the Colchester Branch of TSB when it asks you!

The nominations close at 5pm on Tuesday 30 May.

Thank you for your help!

The fundraising team at MS-UK

MS Awareness Week is here!

Posted on: April 24 2017

Hello,

amy-twibbon.jpgMS Awareness Week has arrived, and I am pleased to say we are celebrating with our beloved mascot Myles.

Here at MS-UK, we believe that anyone affected by multiple sclerosis should be able to access the support and information they need to make their own decisions. We aim to empower people living with MS to have choice and independence, and I hope you’ll join us this MS Awareness Week.

To support MS-UK, just add our Twibbon to your Facebook or Twitter profile pictures.

Thank you for being part of our #SmilesWithMyles campaign – you are helping us to spread a positive message this MS Awareness Week.

Best wishes,

amy-sig.png

Amy Woolf

CEO, MS-UK

Sneak peak: Meet Martin...

Posted on: November 10 2016

As this week is national Trustees’ Week, here’s a sneak peak of an article from our next issue of New Pathways magazine.

So…it’s time to meet Martin!


page-23-25-trustee-chair-martin.jpgMartin Hopkins joined us as an MS-UK Trustee in 2008, and acts as our Chair of the Board. Martin and his wife Rachel have three children, Polly, Alexander and Rowan, and live with a working cocker spaniel called Ruby!

‘I joined the Board of MS-UK for two main reasons. Firstly I wanted to be involved in helping a local charity and using my skills developed in my work to help.

‘Secondly one of my best friends was diagnosed with MS and having seen him deal with the shock of that I felt fairly helpless in terms of the practical support I could offer. I thought therefore that becoming involved with MS-UK would be a way of providing support.’

In his spare time Martin plays the tenor saxophone for fun and runs for fitness and relaxation. His greatest achievement is running 12 Virgin Money London Marathon, ten of them in a row!


In the next issue of New Pathways (which is out on 01 December) we will be introducing all of our Trustees to you, so subscribe today or search for My MS-UK on your app store to get the digital version!

Newly diagnosed with MS? Read me...

Posted on: April 25 2016

Hi everyone,

To celebrate this years MS Awareness Week, I am proud to present our new booklet for people newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.
MS-UK believes that we must listen to the voices of people affected by MS to shape our information and support as it is these people that bring us perspectives that no one else can give. So this booklet is packed full of quotes from real people living with MS.


I hope this booklet will give people the courage to learn more about the condition, when they are ready, and also the choices that are available to them, so they can feel empowered to take back some of the control they may at first feel they have lost.

Thank you for helping us spread a positive message this MS Awareness Week

Amy sig.jpg.jpg

Amy Woolf

CEO, MS-UK

Live Chat Software by Click4Assistance UK