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MS-UK heads to the MS Trust annual conference

Posted on: November 20 2019

On 04 November our Head of Services Diana Crowe, and Laura Amiss-Smith from our MS-UK Helpline attended the 23rd MS Trust annual conference. This year the focus was on the needs of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) from point of diagnosis to end of life, whilst highlighting the importance of delivering holistic care to everyone with MS. 

We had an exhibition stand for a day and we were able to talk to a variety of health professionals, including MS specialist nurses, occupational therapists (OTs) and physiotherapists about the work of MS-UK. We promoted our counselling service and Choices booklets, both of which generated a lot of interest, which was great!

We were both able to attend a couple of the seminars. Diana attended one on ‘MS and work – staying in work and leaving work well’ which was led by two clinical specialist occupational therapists from London. They shared some interesting facts about how 60 to 80 per cent of people with MS lose their job within 15 years because they struggle with fatigue, reduced mobility and cognition. They talked about the barriers to work which included attitudes of employers, demands of the role and activity limitations. The OTs spoke about the importance of early intervention, support to manage work performance and liaison with employers around reasonable adjustments which are just some of the things that can help people with MS to remain in work. The MS-UK blog recently published an article on this same topic.

Laura attended a seminar on ‘The pregnancy year – implementing a MS pregnancy service’ which was delivered by a consultant neurologist, MS specialist nurse, specialist midwife and Sally Darby, founder of Mums Like Us. Discussion was around how to support a woman from the moment they mention their wish to conceive, right the way through to after the baby is born. They also talked about the support for men when discussing drug therapies and their potential impact on reproduction. A personal story was shared by Sally Darby and was very inspiring. She spoke of the importance of community after she found pregnancy and becoming a new mum isolating, with not much support for the disabled mother. She founded an online network called Mums Like Us in 2017 after the birth of her second child.

It was a great to be in the company of so many who work within the MS community.

Visit Mums Like Us

 

 

 

Mr Baum goes to Westminster

Posted on: November 14 2019

Blogger Martin Baum was invited to an event at the House of Commons recently to launch a campaign. Here is his story of his experience...

In an age where blogging is a symbol of 21st century communication, the aim is as much for a blog to be read as it is to be written. As a multiple sclerosis (MS) blogger for various MS-related organisations I am no exception as I continue to try to engage with a loyal and growing readership.

As a writer I enjoy what I do very much but just like having MS it’s a lonely existence. However, sometimes, the unexpected does happen. I recently received an invitation from a charity called Overcoming MS (OMS) to attend a reception they were hosting at the House of Commons.

It was to launch a new campaign video giving everyone living with MS hope of recovery and it was not something I was going to pass up. The reception was sponsored by Stephen Lloyd MP and held in the Strangers Dining Room.

The person behind the promise of living a life free from MS was Professor George Jelinek, an Australian who devised the OMS seven-step recovery program which has enabled him to remain symptom free for 20 years. In truth, however, I was sceptical. Ever since beta interferons failed to sustain the promise of being the cure, I have become naturally wary of anything being promoted as such.

On reading more about Professor Jelinek’s regime prior to my trip to Westminster, it occurred to me my own lifestyle was already accommodating much of what he was advocating. The seven-step program is about following a strict curriculum of diet, sun, vitamin D, exercise, meditation, mindfulness, approved modifying medication, helping to prevent family members from getting MS, and changing a lifestyle for a healthier one.

Whilst I am not vegan I eat very little meat, preferring fish instead. I meditate regularly for ten minutes a day, I exercise as much as I am able to and enjoy the benefits of mindfulness. Most of all, I’ve been changing my lifestyle for a healthier one for several years which means, should I ever want to fully engage with the program, I’m only a couple of steps shy. 

That afternoon I met many MSers sharing a happy disposition to be living with the condition because their symptoms were no longer an issue. Many claimed their lesions had been repelled and that they were now leading happier MS-free lives as a result of following OMS.

Throughout the afternoon I mingled with many inspirational people. Just like any of us, neither MPs nor nobility are immune from being touched by MS because they have family and friends affected by it. Stephen Lloyd’s reason for being there was because he had a constituent who had MS who also follows the OMS approach. That was reason enough for him to sponsor the event.

As the afternoon ended and I parted from some truly inspiring people, I was left feeling that the OMS seven-step recovery program had already succeeded in helping many people. But then my thoughts turned to those who weren’t but might have benefited if they had.

Having MS is a game of patience. We bide our time in what often feels like an isolated existence, waiting for a more traditional breakthrough in the quest to find a cure for the condition. I’m left feeling that more MSers should at least try something like the OMS approach that’s as near to organic as it gets. 

3 steps to help beat stress

Posted on: November 06 2019

simon-rae-IGOBsR93I7Y-unsplash2.jpgIt’s National Stress Awareness Day, but we all know it’s important to take stock of your mental health not just today, but every day. 

Stress affects us all at some point and avoiding it completely can be nearly impossible. But taking steps to reduce it and manage your response to it, can be extremely beneficial. Research has shown that it can even help prevent new disease activity in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

So if you’re craving a little more relaxation, read on.

Meditation

Research has shown that meditation and yoga can reduce stress and cause changes in the brain that allow more stress resilience. Meditation slows the heartbeat and calms the mind, leaving you in a relaxed state. You can find free guided meditations online. Try www.freemindfulness.org/download

Exercise

The role of exercise in helping reduce stress is well proven. One study found that exercise can not only help you manage it in the present, but it can also act as a buffer to protect you from future effects, too.

Personal trainer Dom Thorpe specialises in exercise for people with MS and offers an ‘MS Warrior’ programme online. Visit www.dt-training.co.uk/ms-warrior-programme/

Diet

Pile your plate high with prebiotics, because there is evidence that these feed the good bacteria in your gut, and improve the physiological impact of stress. Prebiotics are fibres found in foods such as chicory, Jerusalem artichokes, raw garlic, leeks and onions. When this fibre is digested by beneficial gut bacteria, the microbes release byproducts which researchers think influence brain function.

Prebiotics were also found to increase the amount of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep that happens. REM sleep is believed to be critical for promoting recovery from stress, with research showing that those who get more REM sleep after a traumatic event are less likely to experience post-traumatic stress disorder.

Finally, when you’re in need of a snack, you could do a lot worse than to reach for a handful of walnuts. A study found these tasty nuts and their oil may help prepare the body to deal with stress. Other studies have shown omega 3 fatty acids, such as the ones found in walnuts, can reduce bad cholesterol and inflammation markers in the body.

For more information about living with multiple sclerosis, subscribe to New Pathways magazine, your MS magazine of choice.

Travelling with a Carer: What are your options?

Posted on: November 05 2019

Travelling with a Carer: What are your options?

Are the dreary winter weather and dark evenings making you dream of sunnier climes? The world is your oyster, says writer Ella Hendrix.

Travelling or going on holiday is one of the delights of life. But, just because you need extra help, it doesn’t mean that you can’t enjoy getting away to see and experiencing new things.

It might seem difficult, but, with a bit of careful planning, anything’s possible. Although going away on your own could be an option, if you make use of a carer in your everyday life, there is also the possibility of travelling with them. There are some CQC regulated care companies that make travelling with your live-in carer possible. With this in mind, you might be able to go to places that you otherwise wouldn’t, as your carer understands your needs and limits.

Trains, planes and automobiles…

As long as you’re planning on travelling by (fairly) conventional means, you shouldn’t have a problem in most parts of the world. International flights, flights within Europe, long-distance planes, and ships should all be well equipped for everyone, including people who have limited mobility, but it is important that if you do have mobility issues you make a travel agent, airline or booking company aware of it.

You might have more difficulty if you are going to a third world country, as they often will not have the same infrastructure as we do here. However, there are usually ways around this, so speak to a booking agent to see that they can do. Make sure that you tell them that you’re travelling with a carer as this might make things easier.

Medication

One big worry for many people, when they go away, is what to do about their medication. If you are travelling with a carer you can ask them to look after your medication but there are still some things that need to be thought about in advance.

Make sure that you carry a doctor’s note and a copy of your prescription so that you can show that you are meant to have it on you, and so that you can get hold of replacements should the worse happen

Make a note of your medicine’s generic name as well as the brand. Many countries use different brands to us here in the UK

Take your medication in its packaging to leave no doubt about what it is.

Remember if it is a liquid to carry it in a clear plastic bag if you are flying

If your medication requires refrigeration you should take it in a cool bag with ice packs that last until you get to where you are staying. If you don’t have your own fridge where you are staying, speak to the management of the place to ask if you can use theirs

Carry medication in your hand luggage

Holidays in the UK

Holliday villages, trendy hostels, hotel spas and well-established hotels are good options. They are usually well equipped for people with health issues and have staff who know exactly what to do to make your stay an enjoyable one. These places are usually fully fitted with wheelchair access, have rooms which are suitable for less mobile people or those who need extra help, and are dedicated to ensuring that everybody has a good time.

Insurance

It is always a good idea to get travel insurance, especially if you are going abroad. This is especially important if you have a pre-existing medical condition or specialist equipment that you want to take with you.

If you’re older, specialist insurance for the over 50s can be useful as it is more tailored. You should also remember that, whilst the UK is still in the EU, a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) can be used alongside (but not replace) your travel insurance. This means that you can get access to state-provided healthcare if you are in an EU country.

There are many benefits to gain from going away, and with a carer, you can find the whole experience enjoyable and not too stressful – just as it should be.

Talking about MS at work - #NationalWorkLifeWeek

Posted on: October 11 2019

This week is National Work Life week, which is all about focusing on wellbeing at work. You might be thinking about talking to your employer about your MS, but just what is the best way to inform them? Rebecca Armstrong, MSer and HR specialist reveals what to consider and what to expect

Rebecca Armstrong smiling and sitting in a chairOne of the hardest questions that I get asked on my Facebook group is ‘should I tell my employer?’ The issue of disclosure is a tricky one, particularly as you won’t know if you have done the right thing until it’s too late. What is true is that once you have done it there is no going back, but remember that can be a good thing. So, if you decide to disclose you then have to decide who to tell and how to do it. In this blog, we focus on these important questions and provide you with some guidance on how to make this important disclosure.

Before you arrange to speak to work, it’s a good idea to prepare what you will say. It is important to remember that multiple sclerosis (MS) can be difficult to understand and so you may need to explain exactly what it is and most importantly how it impacts you. Think about examples of how it impacts your work (if at all) that can help explain.

Be prepared for the response, we have all been frustrated with comments such as ‘you don’t look unwell’ or ‘my Aunty had MS and…’ but often this is someone’s way of trying to make sense of something. When we don’t understand something, we will try and relate it to something we do and often these (insensitive) comments can simply be that. Think about how you can pre-empt such comments by being prepared, for example, ‘MS is different for every person, in fact, no two people are the same, the impact it has on me is…’

Consider taking some resources with you, MS-UK has a range of leaflets available on its website which you can print or provide links to. These are a useful way of providing information in a simple way and of course you could take a copy of the MS-UK magazine, New Pathways!

It is also a good idea to think about what (if anything) you need in terms of reasonable adjustments. Your employer has a legal obligation to make reasonable adjustments, by being clear about what you need it will help this process. Of course, for many of us, we may not need adjustments straight away. Consider requesting a regular review (if you don’t have this already), so that if this changes you can discuss what is needed.

Once you have decided what to say, the final consideration is who to tell. Typically this would be your manager as they will be the person who supports you day to day. You can expect that they will need to tell the HR department so that you can make sure you are properly supported. They may ask you who you want to know about your MS at work and of course you can choose that you do not want anyone else to know about it.

Disclosure is a big step and one which is entirely your choice, you are not obliged to tell your employer about your MS. However, if they are not aware then they will not be able to support you.

To continue the conversation and discuss any other MS work related issues join Rebecca’s MS & Work group on Facebook.

 

7 mental health myths busted

Posted on: October 10 2019

Today is World Mental Health Day and our MS-UK Counselling team are looking at common mental health myths head on…

Myths and beliefs about mental health issues can be instilled in us from an early age. These myths and beliefs are not designed to harm – they are passed to us in good faith mainly from parental figures, care givers and the environment in which we develop. These myths are designed to protect us from emotional issues rather than support us. The result is that we learn how to suppress our emotions rather than express them. Here are some common myths we often come across as counsellors with MS-UK…

Myth 1 - Mental health problems are rare

Mental health problems are widespread. According to Time to Change, around one in four people will experience a mental health problem each year and they can affect people from every walk of life.

Myth 2 - I can’t do anything to support someone with a mental health problem

The simple response here is, yes you can!

  • Check in

Ask how somebody is doing. It’s highly unlikely that you will make things worse. In fact, it may be that your relative, friend or colleague needs to talk to somebody and you ask them how they are doing helps them to open up about how they are feeling

  • Listen and try not to judge them

People want to feel heard. You offering a listening ear can often help more than you realise. Try not to judge what the person is saying, even though what you are hearing may be shocking. They are being brave talking to you

  • Treat them in the same way

Sometimes the person may feel worried or feel embarrassed about what they may have shared with you and wonder how you are going to act around them going forward. Try and treat them in the same way as you did before they opened up to you

  • Ask twice

It is OK to ask if somebody wants to talk more than once. It may be that the first time you asked them they didn’t feel able or ready to talk but they feel able to talk now

Myth 3 - People experiencing mental health problems aren’t able to work

People living with mental health problems can hold down a successful job. If one in four people experience a mental health problem each year these statistics suggest that in fact we probably all work with someone who is experiencing a mental health problem.

Myth 4 - People with mental health problems can’t recover

People can and do recover from mental health conditions and recovery means being able to live, work, learn and participate in the community. There is lots of different support and help available to help people recover.

Mental health problems may not go away forever but lots of people with mental health problems still work, have families and friends, engage in hobbies and interests and lead full lives.

These websites offer support:

www.rethink.org

www.mind.org.uk

www.samaritans.org

Myth 5 - People living with mental health conditions are usually violent and unpredictable

Most people living with mental health conditions are not violent. In fact, somebody with mental illness is actually more likely to be a victim of violence than to inflict it. According to Time to Change, the movement working to end mental health discrimination, the majority of violent crimes are committed by people who do not have mental health problems. It also states people with mental health problems pose more of a danger to themselves than to others, with 90% of people dying through suicide having experienced mental distress.

Myth 6 - Young people just go through ups and down as part of puberty – it doesn’t mean anything

One in eight young people experience a mental health problem, according to the NHS’s Mental Health of Children and Young People 2017 report. This statistic is widely thought to just be the tip of the iceberg. You may find it helpful to look at the charity, Young Minds. Visit www.youngminds.org.uk/.

Myth 7 - People with mental health problems are lazy and should try harder to snap out of it

This is not true. There are many reasons why someone may have a mental health problem and being lazy or weak is not one of them. People cannot just snap out of a mental health problem and many people may need help to get better. This help may include counselling, medication, self help and support from friends and family.

Mental health and multiple sclerosis

Depressive disorders occur at high rates among patients with MS and this can have a major, negative impact on quality of life for people living with multiple sclerosis, according to a study. However, counselling can be helpful in finding ways to talk about thoughts and feelings associated with MS.

Find out more about MS-UK Counselling today.

Guest blog: ‘Counselling made me feel cared for’

Posted on: October 10 2019

Julie.jpgIt is World Mental Health Day and in this guest blog, Julie tells us why she took years to come to terms with her diagnosis of MS and how MS-UK Counselling has helped her…

‘To this day I struggle to think about the day I was given the news of my diagnosis. Unfortunately, it was dealt with dreadfully. I was on my own and not prepared at all. The consultant showed me my MRI scan and quite bluntly said the only thing she could think was that it was MS. I could barely breathe but knew I had to try to listen so as not to miss any information. She asked me what I was doing later that afternoon and I replied that I was due to go on holiday with my husband and daughter. She said: ‘Have a good time and try not to think about it too much.’ I couldn't believe what I was hearing, the sheer insensitivity. It took me years to accept my diagnosis and to learn to accept it.’

My diagnosis

‘I first noticed something was wrong around 2009 whilst on a charity walk. After around 40 minutes my right foot felt wobbly and slapped the ground. I didn't take much notice and for the next few years, nothing changed much until one day when I was meeting a friend in town. I parked a way out and by the time I got to the centre my right leg really ached and I couldn't control my foot. I made an appointment with my GP who couldn't find anything much but referred me for physiotherapy. Physio had no effect and when I described the symptoms of weakness, a tickling sensation and pins and needles I was referred for an MRI of my spine. This came back as normal but the consultant decided I should have further imaging of my head and neck and it was this scan that showed the lesions.’

Counselling

‘One day, my MS nurse pointed out that every year I bring up the bad experience I had when I was diagnosed, and maybe I should consider some counselling

‘I had no reservations about accepting help and found it a relief to talk to my counsellor. My first session was comforting and I felt listened to and cared for. I felt I mattered. 

‘The service has helped immensely. I have discovered I am actually stronger than I thought and have learned coping mechanisms for the times that are tricky. 

‘I would say to anybody struggling emotionally not to wait as I did and to seek help. It is available, and any good GP will help, or you can self-refer. The good thing about the MS-UK Counselling service is that the people have knowledge of the disease which makes a huge difference. 

‘I have also found exercise and meditation hugely beneficial in helping with anxiety.’

About MS-UK Counselling 

MS-UK Counselling is confidential and open to anyone living with multiple sclerosis. MS-UK counsellors are registered or accredited with the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) with knowledge of MS and its impact on mental wellbeing. MS-UK is a BACP organisational member and our number is 275169.

Register online today or call us on 01206 226500 to find out more.

Guest blog: ‘Someone who is independent, who doesn’t know me but just wants to support and help …’

Posted on: October 10 2019

Adam.jpgAs part of our series of blogs today for World Mental Health day, Adam tells us about his first counselling session with MS-UK and how he felt supported to open up to someone who was completely removed from his experiences of living with multiple sclerosis…

‘I was first diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in March 2018 after one episode of symptoms. After I was told the news I was initially in a state of shock and just remember my wife bursting onto tears. I didn’t want to see or speak to anybody and I just couldn’t believe what was happening.

‘I have four children and all I could think of was them. I had a million questions in my head. How would I look after them? Would they end up looking after me?

‘The biggest feelings were ones of guilt and helplessness. I felt like the diagnosis meant my life was pretty much over and I would be a burden to those I am closest to. The feelings of helplessness were due to the lack of information and the unpredictability of the disease. Everything is a ‘maybe’ as each person is different so it’s a difficult diagnosis to understand and explain to others.

‘I found the information booklets produced by MS-UK and the MS Trust a great way of not only explaining the condition to friends and family but also for me to understand the condition and that the things I was feeling were normal.

Counselling

‘I saw a tweet from MS-UK which mentioned the counselling service and I thought to myself that it couldn’t hurt to try. The idea of counselling did have an appeal.

‘I feel lucky as I have a great support network but it’s hard sometimes when you do want to talk about MS but don’t want the guilt of burdening someone close to you. I did have reservations, mainly because it was a new experience and that unnatural feeling that comes from sharing things with a stranger. Fear of being judged came into it as well, although I quickly realised this was not something to worry about.

‘The first session left me feeling so positive. It was just so nice to have someone really listening. Someone who is independent, who doesn’t know me but just wants to support and help.

‘When we went through the initial checklist of things I may be struggling with, I did have a realisation that some of them were affecting me more than I thought. You do wonder how talking through things will actually help and this is perhaps the biggest reservation, but after just one session I absolutely understood how I could benefit from the service.

‘Counselling has helped me really think about my needs and gave me the opportunity to be reflective in my thoughts about how I interact with people, what I enjoy doing and how to feel positive about the future.

‘This service also helped me feel empowered to talk through some of the anxieties I was feeling living with MS. It really did feel like a journey and I do think about decisions and choices in a different and more positive manner.

‘I have definitely got better at recognising the things I’m proud of now, no matter how small. Using the MS-UK counselling service has made me realise that sometimes the simplest achievements can be proud moments to celebrate.’

About MS-UK Counselling 

MS-UK Counselling is confidential and open to anyone living with multiple sclerosis. MS-UK counsellors are registered or accredited with the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) with knowledge of MS and its impact on mental wellbeing. MS-UK is a BACP organisational member and our number is 275169.

Register online today or call us on 01206 226500 to find out more.

MS-UK attends medicinal cannabis event

Posted on: October 02 2019

MS-UK was invited to attend a medicinal cannabis event in London on Monday 16 September. The event was set up and facilitated by Medical Choices UK a non-profit medicinal cannabis and education organisation. Its mission is ‘to help bring medicinal cannabis to those who need it by educating those who can prescribe it and lobbying those who can improve access’. MS-UK’s Helpline and Information Officer, Ryan Jones and Head of Services Diana Crowe went along to find out more.

The event gave information on:

  • The history of cannabis use as a medicine
  • The human Endocannabinoid System (ECS)
  • How Phytocannabinoids (naturally occurring cannabinoids) from cannabis plants interact with the ECS
  • The scientific and clinical evidence for prescribing in various conditions and symptoms
  • Current research
  • Dosage forms and pharmaceutical presentations
  • The UK prescribing pathway and regulatory system
  • A patient perspective - a description of efficacy

Amongst the very knowledgeable and experienced presenters was Dr Julie Moltke who qualified as a Doctor at Copenhagen University of Medicine and studied in both Stockholm and Paris. She has a strong holistic approach, a passion for mental health and is a certified yoga and mindfulness teacher. She has set up an online magazine-style website called ‘dosage’. As part of her work Julie is currently travelling the world and exploring the cannabis industry.

After the event, Ryan said, “One of the things that I took away from Julie’s presentation was to dispel the common myth that Cannabidiol (CBD) is not psychoactive. Julie said that CBD still has an effect on the brain, so is therefore psychoactive, but is best described as ‘non-intoxicating’. That makes a lot of sense and has cleared up a misconception that I held”. 

We also heard from a Director of Medical Choices UK Michael Platt who is an anaesthetics and pain medicine specialist based in London. He has been a consultant and honorary senior lecturer in pain medicine and anaesthetics since 1991. He recently became the medical director at Sapphire Medical Clinics, a new clinic for medicinal cannabis. He gave a good round-up of the current evidence and data available relating to medicinal cannabis and spoke passionately about being pleased that he now has another ‘tool’ to treat pain.

Most interestingly, we also heard from Jason Jordan from Perth, Western Australia, who lives with primary progressive MS and is a medicinal cannabis advocate. Jason was the first person in Australia to have been prescribed medicinal cannabis and he described its effect on his quality of life as a ‘game-changer’. He was quite explicit about the fact that he was not a recreational cannabis user and that he had been able to manage his symptoms so much better since receiving his prescription. 

Both Diana and Ryan both came away from the event feeling more informed and a little clearer about how medicinal cannabis can be accessed here in the UK.

For more information about cannabis and MS download our Choices leaflet here

Guest blog: Lydia from the MS Trust tells us about the new neurological toolkit

Posted on: August 29 2019

Image of doctors clipboard with penA new toolkit has been developed to help local health groups improve services for people living with progressive neurological conditions in England. The MS Trust was one of seven charities involved in developing the new guidance.

Lydia, communications officer at the MS Trust, explains more in this guest blog...

Healthcare services have been failing people with neurological conditions like multiple sclerosis (MS) for far too long. That’s a fact. The number of people living with neurological conditions in England is rising and will continue to increase. But, for a number of years now, neurology has not been a national priority for the NHS. Research shows that those living with progressive neurological conditions are experiencing delays in diagnosis and treatment, fragmented and uncoordinated services, limited availability of neuro-specialist rehab and reablement and a lack of psycho–social support. 

This inequality is simply not fair.

The NHS RightCare Toolkit for Progressive Neurological Conditions has been developed to help change that and ensure people living with brain and nerve conditions like MS, Parkinson’s and Motor Neurone Disease (MND) get the care and support they need and deserve.

Seven charities (MS Trust, MS Society, Parkinson’s UK, MND Association, Sue Ryder, MSA Trust and PSP Association) joined forces with NHS experts to produce the toolkit. The hope is that Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs)  will take full advantage of this unique opportunity; that they will use the practical, clear and innovative guidance the toolkit provides to tackle some of the big challenges people with these conditions face and ultimately improve healthcare services for this group, now and in the future.

If implemented in the right way, the numbers speak for themselves: up to 2,500 emergency admissions to hospital a year could be avoided for patients with these conditions as a result, with up to £10 million freed up to fund improved services.

So what does this mean for people with MS? The toolkit outlines four priorities that need addressing in MS care: improving the efficiency of disease modifying drug management, better use of data and technology to free up the valuable time of MS specialists, holistic support for people with advanced MS, and more MS specialists from different areas working together to provide joined-up care.

MS health professionals do an incredible job with the resources at their disposal and we know that many services are already delivering high quality care - the toolkit has real-life examples of best practice from across the country. But we want to help all areas reach the same high standard and make this best practice a reality for all. We will work closely with the other charities involved to support efforts to see the toolkit implemented effectively, with the shared aim of improving care for everyone living with a progressive neurological condition in England.

You can download the full NHS RightCare Progressive Neurological Conditions Toolkit from the NHS England website...

Visit the NHS England website

This blog is from the MS Trust...

This blog has kindly been written by the MS Trust. To find out more about them visit the MS Trust website or if you’re living with MS and would like to share your experiences of healthcare, please get in touch with the MS Trust at comms@mstrust.org.uk.

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