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Appointment number three of the MS-STAT2 trial

Posted on: September 30 2019

Cathy Howard 2_0.pngCathy Howard updates us on the next stage of the statins trial

I was up early again, which was just as well because parking was an absolute nightmare at the station! When we got to UCL Queens Square Institute of Neurology my appointment hadn’t been logged on their computer, so John and I had to wait for about an hour and a half to allow for my records to be released and my prescription to be authorised and filled at the pharmacy. We consoled ourselves with lunch and coffee at a local Italian restaurant.

Once the appointment resumed the lovely nurse Sarah looked after me again. She took the remainder of my original prescribed statin/placebo and replaced it with 2 new bottles and a six-month diary. She took blood and my blood pressure, and Dr Tom Williams noted some headaches and nausea I’d experienced during the first month. He also checked my lungs and heart. As long as these blood tests are ok, I can start to take two tablets per day increasing from one. I was able to collect a CD-Rom with my MRI scan on. So excited as it’s been a long time since I last had one done.

As long as my GP is happy, I can have my next lot of blood tests, at the end of November or the start of December at my local surgery. A few days afterwards I’ll get a phone call at home from one of the research team to ask me a few questions. I’ll let you know how it all goes.

 

Baseline testing day on the MS-STAT2 trial

Posted on: September 06 2019

Cathy Howard 2_0.pngMSer Cathy Howard updates us on the next stage of the statins trial

I was up with the lark again and even earlier than my last appointment! I got to UCL Queens Square Institute of Neurology almost an hour early, but I’d much rather be early than late.

A lovely nurse called Sarah took us through to the same area we were in last time and got me my second coffee of the day. She also gave me a Baseline worksheet with questions about how my MS currently affects me physically and mentally.

Dr Nevin John explained the day’s process, went through reams of paperwork with me and I signed five more informed consent forms for sub-studies. Don’t think of the trees!

Then the tests began. The Dr who administered those was very thorough and put me through a battery of sight, memory and manual dexterity tests, as well as a comprehensive neurological test. Records were taken after each part of each test.

I completed another walking test with a mobile phone with the MSteps app attached to my arm.

I had six lots of blood taken by another lovely nurse and a cannula inserted for contrast dye to be given part way through the lengthy MRI scan. I have some anxiety issues with MRIs so my GP kindly prescribed me diazepam as a sedative.

The last part of my day was 45 minutes of MRI scans. I estimate I had about 15 separate scans of varying durations. I was asked if I’d like some music whilst in the scanner, and I thought – well, I was an 80s teenager, so Madonna would be perfect. Although I couldn’t hear a lot of it whilst the bangs, clicks and dings were going on, when there were quieter periods, I was Vogueing (in my head) and being a strutting Material Girl! The technician who completed the scans will let me have a copy of the scan at my next appointment. Yay! It means I’ll be able to discuss it with my neurologist Dr Giles Elrington next time I see him. I haven’t had an MRI since my diagnosis, so I’m quite excited about that.

I was given my statin/placebo with a diary to keep updated. One tablet a night for a month. My next appointment is on 24 September. Bring it on!

Guest blog: Lydia from the MS Trust tells us about the new neurological toolkit

Posted on: August 29 2019

Image of doctors clipboard with penA new toolkit has been developed to help local health groups improve services for people living with progressive neurological conditions in England. The MS Trust was one of seven charities involved in developing the new guidance.

Lydia, communications officer at the MS Trust, explains more in this guest blog...

Healthcare services have been failing people with neurological conditions like multiple sclerosis (MS) for far too long. That’s a fact. The number of people living with neurological conditions in England is rising and will continue to increase. But, for a number of years now, neurology has not been a national priority for the NHS. Research shows that those living with progressive neurological conditions are experiencing delays in diagnosis and treatment, fragmented and uncoordinated services, limited availability of neuro-specialist rehab and reablement and a lack of psycho–social support. 

This inequality is simply not fair.

The NHS RightCare Toolkit for Progressive Neurological Conditions has been developed to help change that and ensure people living with brain and nerve conditions like MS, Parkinson’s and Motor Neurone Disease (MND) get the care and support they need and deserve.

Seven charities (MS Trust, MS Society, Parkinson’s UK, MND Association, Sue Ryder, MSA Trust and PSP Association) joined forces with NHS experts to produce the toolkit. The hope is that Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs)  will take full advantage of this unique opportunity; that they will use the practical, clear and innovative guidance the toolkit provides to tackle some of the big challenges people with these conditions face and ultimately improve healthcare services for this group, now and in the future.

If implemented in the right way, the numbers speak for themselves: up to 2,500 emergency admissions to hospital a year could be avoided for patients with these conditions as a result, with up to £10 million freed up to fund improved services.

So what does this mean for people with MS? The toolkit outlines four priorities that need addressing in MS care: improving the efficiency of disease modifying drug management, better use of data and technology to free up the valuable time of MS specialists, holistic support for people with advanced MS, and more MS specialists from different areas working together to provide joined-up care.

MS health professionals do an incredible job with the resources at their disposal and we know that many services are already delivering high quality care - the toolkit has real-life examples of best practice from across the country. But we want to help all areas reach the same high standard and make this best practice a reality for all. We will work closely with the other charities involved to support efforts to see the toolkit implemented effectively, with the shared aim of improving care for everyone living with a progressive neurological condition in England.

You can download the full NHS RightCare Progressive Neurological Conditions Toolkit from the NHS England website...

Visit the NHS England website

This blog is from the MS Trust...

This blog has kindly been written by the MS Trust. To find out more about them visit the MS Trust website or if you’re living with MS and would like to share your experiences of healthcare, please get in touch with the MS Trust at comms@mstrust.org.uk.

"I’m taking part in the MS-STAT2 trial, follow my journey"

Posted on: August 22 2019

Cathy Howard 2.pngHi, I’m Cathy Howard, I’m 51 and have secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). I was originally diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS in 1998 at the age of 30 and I later took ill-health retirement from work in early 2015.

I use two sticks to walk short distances, or a wheelchair or scooter if I’m going out. I applied for the Simvastatin trial as I was conscious that apart from some fundraising for MS Society and MS-UK over the years, I’ve never really done a great deal for others with multiple sclerosis (MS).

The MS-STAT2 trial is a double-blind study, which means that I don’t know whether I’ll be taking Simvastatin or a placebo, and neither do the Drs who administer and regulate it. To be honest, although it would be a bonus to me if I took the drug and it worked, I’ll be happy just participating. I will be sharing my experience of participating in the trial through regular blog posts on the MS-UK blog, so watch this space!

Today is my screening day appointment (19 August 2019). I got up ridiculously early because my husband John was stressed about us getting the train with booked assistance for me in my wheelchair. Bleary-eyed we head out to the station. I was eager for my first coffee of the day.

The train was on time and we got to UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology in London about 45 minutes early. Dr Tom Williams, MS Clinical Research Fellow, came to meet us and escorted us through the rabbit warren of corridors to the trial room. Here I had my second cup of coffee and I’m started to feel awake.

Tom introduced Dr Nevin John, MS Medical Clinical Research Fellow, who is also part of the study. Nevin advised me about the trial, what to expect and possible side effects of statins. He asked me questions, completed forms based on my replies, and requested for me initial consent forms. There is so much paperwork and record-keeping involved!

I then had a basic physical examination, including blood pressure and blood oxygen levels, and my heart and breathing listened too. My height and weight were checked and I had various vials of blood taken for testing.

I also agreed to take part in a brain oxygen study and mSteps smartphone analysis. I was wired up to the brain oxygen study machine and computer and baseline readings were taken. Then I had three separate minutes to say as many words as I can that start with a selected letter. Not as easy as you may think! From the problems I had, I expect I’ve got very little oxygen reaching my brain!

An app is being developed to accurately record walking distance and speed etc. I had a mobile phone with the app on it strapped to my arm and was asked to walk short distances. This also served for the walking part of the MS-STAT2 screening process.

All in all, it was a very interesting appointment. I was completely exhausted by the time I got home but felt like I’d actually done something productive and I’m smiling as I write this! This is it for now, but I’ll update you all on the next part of my journey very soon!

Your MS magazine of choice hot off the press!

Posted on: April 03 2019

Issue 114 front cover_1.jpgIssue 114 of New Pathways magazine is out now. In this jam-packed edition, we take a look at the recent changes that could affect those of you who take CBD oil, on page 12. We also ask ourselves “Am I having a relapse?” Whether you’re newly diagnosed or have been living with MS for years, there will come a time when you will ask yourself this question, to find out more turn to page 39.

Page 21 offers some helpful advice to those who have found themselves caring for a friend or loved one and don’t know where to start when it comes to finding support.

Louise Willis MS-UK Counsellor talks about managing fatigue and how spoon theory can help you manage and explain it to others on page 28.

MSer and feature writer Ian Cook investigates if magnets can help multiple sclerosis in Cook’s Report Revisited on page 19.

Mary Wilson, #5 Para-Badminton player in the world, reveals her hopes of representing Team GB in Tokyo 2020 Paralympics on page 24, and discover how music therapy could help your MS on page 23.

In addition, don’t forget to read all the latest news and real life stories from MSers living life to the full and why not give our tasty free recipe a try!

Enjoy reading!

About New Pathways

New Pathways magazine is a truly community led publication written by people with MS for people with MS. Each issue offers a variety of information on drugs, complementary therapies and symptom management, plus all the latest news and research and your amazing real life stories.

To subscribe, visit www.ms-uk.org/NewPathways, or call 0800 783 0518. Audio, plain text and digital versions of the magazine are available on request, simply call 01206 226500 and let us know your requirements.

Research shout out: MS patient and carer views needed to inform NHS Wales

Posted on: March 08 2019

The All Wales Medicines Strategy Group (AWMSG) are seeking the views of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and carers about new medicines it will consider recommending for use in NHS Wales, such as fingolimod (Gilenya), to treat MS in paediatric patients.

They would like you to share with them what it is like to live with MS or to care for someone who has it, and by contributing you will provide invaluable information about patient and carer needs. 

In addition, they will be asking clinical experts to give their views and the medical facts. All of this information combined will give a really good insight into the real effects MS has on patients and carers and help inform the drug approval process. You are not expected to have all the answers, but anything you can share will be incredibly helpful.

If you would like to share your experience download the questionnaire to complete and send it to the address below by the 18 March 2019:

All Wales Therapeutics & Toxicology Centre

Academic Centre

University Hospital Llandough

Penlan Road, Llandough

Vale of Glamorgan

CF64 2XX

Alternatively you can fill out the questionnaire here. All information shared with AWMSG will be kept confidential. 

AWMSG is meeting on 15 May 2019. At the meeting the group’s lay member will summarise all comments from patients and carers, and patient organisations. Only AWTTC and committee members will read the completed questionnaires.

If you would like more information, or help with completing the questionnaire, please call 02920 716900 or email AWTTC@wales.nhs.uk.

10 things I wish I'd been told about Lemtrada treatment for my MS

Posted on: October 30 2018

Joanna Livermore Image.jpgIn her latest blog, MSer Joanna talks about her first round of Lemtrada and reveals what made recovery easier for her.

Back in June 2018, I had my first round of Lemtrada. Here’s all the things I wish I’d been told beforehand!

1. Drink

Drink as much water as possible, and I'm talking in excess of 3 litres a day. Take cordial to make it easier to drink. Especially as when that awful steroid taste gets in your mouth, water is almost unbearable. Keep asking the nurses for top ups. It helped keep my body temperature and blood pressure down, and held any headaches at bay.

2. Mint imperials are your friend!

That steroid taste is awful during the infusion, but does go afterwards. Mint imperials helped a lot. Take a couple of bags with you. You won't regret it.

3. Get outside

I found it helped if I could get out in the fresh air. You're not bedbound during your stay. Stick around during your infusion, but it helps to get outside even just for half an hour at some point that's convenient.

4. Keep busy

Some days go quicker than others but there's only so much of the comings and goings on the ward that you can watch before you need something else. Watch that series you've been meaning to watch on Netflix, write someone a letter, or do a crossword.

5. Try and retain normality

Every morning I had a shower and did my hair and make-up. Having a bit of a routine made me feel normal. Keep this up during your recovery too. It really does help your mental health.

6. Steroid crash

I only took steroids on day 1 to 3 of my infusion. Because I hadn't had steroids before the Lemtrada, my body had a hissy fit. You might have some kind of emotional crash. Just to add insult to injury, you'll probably break out in what looks like hives. Don't touch them. It's not that itchy unless you make that fatal, first scratch.

7. Don't suffer in silence

Us MSers are used to putting on a brave face. We rarely feel 100% but for the most part we shrug it off. But you do not need to be superman or woman when you're in hospital. Have a rash? Accept the IV piriton. Have a tight chest? Take the nebuliser. Nobody's going to call you a hero for soldiering through. They'll probably say you're stupid if you do that!

8. Questions

Ask all the questions. Continue to do so when you come out. Use the #Lemtrada hashtag on social media to find other people in your shoes. If you're in the UK, join the Lemtrada group on Facebook. Keep on learning and talking to other people that "get it".

9. Plan ahead

The last thing you'll want to do when you get out is go to the supermarket. You'll think you can, but after 20 minutes you'll probably realise it's the worst idea of your life. Whilst in hospital, get ahead of the game and schedule a home delivery.

10. Rest

Rest. You're going to have good and bad days. You might feel like you're having a "pseudo relapse" with every symptom you've ever had flaring to it's worst. You'll have a good day then pay for it the following day. Be gentle on yourself. It's not a miracle cure, you won't suddenly be OK overnight. Things might take a while. But it'll be worth it.

You can read more from Joanna on her blog ms-understood.com

Learn more about Lemtrada in our DMT Choices leaflet

New Pathways sneak peak: mindfulness, being a carer with MS, mobility and more...

Posted on: October 20 2018

Front cover image of New PathwaysHello,

I am thrilled to share a sneak peak into the latest issue of New Pathways magazine, which is out now!

Our cover star this issue is MSer and HR Specialist Rebecca Armstrong, who discusses being your own boss and taking a step into self-employment on page 16. 

On page 24-25, wellness coach and Director of Work.Live.Thrive Zoe Flint discusses how relaxation can help boost your immune and central nervous systems. This feature all about mindfulness for MS shares Zoe's insights and her top 5 things to get your started. 

Also, MSer and Feature Writer Ian Cook reveals his first-hand experience of becoming a carer. Ian says, 'It may sound strange to say this but I believe being disabled is, in many ways, the perfect qualification to care for another disabled person.' Read the full article on page 12, and don't forget to check out his 'revisited' article on page 42 all about Shopmobility. 

Fats have once again been dominating the news of late, so we asked MSer and Nutritional Science Researcher Sharon Peck to reveal the truth and explain what we really need to know on page 19. We also take a look at the natural remedies lurking in the back of your kitchen cupboard that could help relieve MS symptoms on page 18.

If you would like to see something specific in New Pathways please email me and let me know your thoughts or feedback. 

Enjoy reading!

Sarah-Jane

Editor, New Pathways

New Pathways issue 110 - The Editor's Letter

Posted on: August 01 2018

Hello!Issue 110 Front Cover of New Pathways

This issue of New Pathways magazine is jam packed full of a variety of news, features and real life stories. Start your read by catching up on all the latest developments in MS on pages 4-10. Then why not discover nine anti-inflammatory foods that could benefit your diet and MS on page 34.

Next we take a look at how a condition that predominantly affects women, actually impacts men on page 12. And on pages 30 and 32 MSer and feature writer Ian Cook revisits Access to Work and gives electric wheelchairs a spin.

Stem cells research and personal stories are still dominating the news, so we thought we would produce an update on this ever popular treatment option on page 24.

Also in this issue, MSer and HR Specialist Rebecca Armstrong explains how to get the best out of occupational health on page 16, we take a look at the therapeutic benefits of horse therapy on page 18, and Rosalind Barton reveals the highlights of her surprisingly accessible trip to Singapore.

Subscribe today to read all this and much more!

Sarah-Jane

Editor, New Pathways