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Guest blog: Glen and David’s story

Posted on: February 13 2019

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On Valentine’s Day, when love is all around us, Glen and David reflect on the strength of love in the face of multiple sclerosis (MS) in this guest blog. They tell us why a dear friend’s diagnosis of MS led them to take on the mighty marathon challenge...

After years trying to get a place for the Virgin Monday London Marathon, we have both secured a place to run the race on Sunday 28 April 2019, and we could not be more excited!

Our training is now underway and we have also joined the Prestwich Athletics Club to help us with our training. This year we are extremely proud to be supporting MS-UK who provide support to those awaiting a diagnosis for multiple sclerosis or for those already living with it. A charity like this is something that is very close to our hearts.

So why have we chosen this charity?

We moved onto our street in 2003 after taking a leap of faith in buying a new house in an area that we didn’t really know much about. Then, in 2004, a lovely young couple named Chris and Claire bought and moved into the house directly opposite to ours and right next door to our already great friends Helen and Jamie. We were all of similar ages and starting out with our grown up futures ahead of us. It wasn’t very long until we all struck up a great friendship and we started socialising together with dinner parties, drinks and silly karaoke discos!

We had formed an amazing triangle of trust between each couple and began making some truly brilliant memories. We were very lucky to have such fantastic neighbours that we could now call true friends. All of our futures were bright.

Soon after moving in, Chris and Claire got married. They had a beautiful wedding ceremony and celebrations in France. It was their perfect day and the start of their married bliss. Unfortunately, two weeks later their world was turned upside down and their future together took an unexpected turn after Claire was diagnosed as having multiple sclerosis. For a couple who were just starting out on their planned journey, their future was having to be rewritten.

Fast forward to 2019, and we can now look back and share what their journey has been so far…and how MS has affected Claire, Chris, their families and us as friends.

Anyone who is diagnosed with MS will soon learn that no two journeys are the same. The body is a wondrous thing, but how MS takes over it, is different for everyone. We had never had anyone close to us have MS, so this was all new to us all.

The text books say that MS is a chronic, typically progressive disease involving damage to the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. How was this diagnosis of Claire’s going to manifest itself? We have now seen first-hand that this disease can be debilitating. A bright, fit and healthy young lady with a fantastic future as a school teacher slowly had the carpet pulled from under her feet by the effects of MS taking over her body. The past 10 years have been a rollercoaster for Claire and Chris and everyone around them.

No matter how much fight you put up, the fatigue and progressive failing limbs can bring the strongest of people down. With that comes the black depressive days when you realise that your independence is ebbing away, you feel isolated and being a proud person is a blocker on accepting the support you may eventually need.

We have witnessed Claire’s battle with MS and her battle with herself. The ups and downs, highs and lows all followed. The pain, tiredness, frustration, sadness and steely determination not to be beaten. The intense pressure on both Claire and

Chris would have been a significant test on any relationship. Both have had to adapt to a life that neither of them planned for or ever wanted. Their love and strength for each other has been incredible.

Huge decisions had to be made on what their new future could be. Family and friends also had to adapt their lives to be able to offer love and support when needed and to take into account Claire’s capabilities, ensuring she was not being excluded. To watch your wife, daughter, sister or friend battle with something that you cannot physically help them with is cruel. How do you react? What can you ask or say? When is it appropriate to step in? No-one can teach you these things but you have to stay strong for that person and just wait until they are ready to let you in. Even in writing this piece we sought approval from Claire as she is still a very private person and contains her situation within those people very close to her.

Eventually realising their limits, Claire and Chris had to find another single level house where her mobility was not as exasperated. MS was preventing Claire to live a normal life by taking away her ability to be fully mobile. It was a very sad day for us all when they left their home opposite us to move into a house they had to choose because of Claire’s condition. Fortunately, they didn’t have to go too far, so we have maintained our fantastic friendships and memory making which we all do with joy!

Through receiving fantastic support from MS specialists and from the care services, Claire and Chris are now living much happier within the confines of what MS has done to her mobility. They have received some amazing treatment, adapted their home, lifestyle and accepted care that has been put in place to support them both. Whilst Claire is physically restricted, she is now embracing her life and extracting everything she possibly can with a beautiful smile on her face. Our triangle of trust is now stronger than ever, and the support network has expanded, with even more very special friends joining the fundraising team. Go #TeamPurple!

Since the times Claire was first diagnosed, there has been huge progress made on the support people can get from having an early diagnosis, improved medications and treatments and more research being done.

This is where MS-UK come into their own. The work they do is helping many people in the same situation as Claire and Chris. It is an amazing charity which does great things.

We are now looking to support them to raise awareness and make a difference to the amazing work that they do via our fundraising. We have a £2,000 target and need your help to reach it!

Many thanks for your support!

Glen & David xx

Visit Glen and David's JustGiving page

Top 5 tips to ensure you’re buying quality CBD products

Posted on: February 12 2019

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In our latest guest blog Henry Vicenty, CEO of cannabidiol (CBD) oil producer Endoca, walks us through his top 5 tips to buying quality CBD products for managing your multiple sclerosis (MS).

 

1. Does the company have publically accessible, easy to understand lab reports?

Companies such as Endoca selling quality products will be proud of their lab reports, and will want their customers and the general public to have easy access to information regarding what is in their products. Do a quick search of the company website, or reach out to their customer services team who should be able to point you in the right direction. You want to see cannabinoids listed, as well as terpenes and evidence of absent chemicals and pesticides. 

2. Are the products organic and whole plant?

If the products are certified organic, you will see the logo on the website. Some companies will grow organically but may not have a certification, which isn’t ideal but even without certification, a quick glance over their lab reports should show the testing for, and subsequently negative levels of a variety of chemicals or toxins. 

Research and anecdotal reports support the claim that whole plant CBD extracts are more therapeutically potent than isolated CBD extracts alone. Make sure the lab reports of your products show terpene and other trace cannabinoid levels, otherwise you may be buying an isolated CBD product, which means the company is using only the CBD molecule in a carrier oil and no other beneficial plant molecules. 

3. Is the CBD amount of the product clearly labelled and verifiable?

As the industry is yet to be standardised, bottle sizes and CBD levels are all dependant on the company, so it’s hard to truly know if the product you’re using is good value for money. Endoca have created this CBD calculator, which helps you work out the monetary amount per milligram of CBD, which is important when trying to decide between products. 

4. Are there clear quality standards in place? 

Without clear quality standards there is no guarantee of safety in the product you are purchasing so make sure you ask the company for proof of the quality standards they have in place. Ask if the products are Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) certified (when products are of pharmaceutical quality) and for any other certifications they hold that show their product is safe for consumption.

5. Is their website content clear and informative and do they have many online reviews?

As CBD is a new industry for many people, there is an abundance of misinformation online, including information that you can find on many CBD company websites. Unfortunately, it’s very easy to buy CBD in bulk and rebrand it as your own, so if the company you’re buying from provides limited information, or is not clear in giving you all the tools you need to make an informed decision or purchase, steer clear. Also, finding online sources of product reviews is vital to hearing about the experiences of others using the same products.

You can read more about cannabis in our Cannabis and MS Choices leaflet online.

Read the Cannabis and MS Choices Leaflet online

Guest blog: ‘Raising’ funds for MS-UK!

Posted on: February 05 2019

In this guest blog, John Williams tells us all about why he has chosen to 'raise' funds for MS-UK!

My name is John Williams and I’ve been asked to write a blog because of the way I’m trying to raise a little money for MS-UK. I’ve never done anything like this before so I’ll apologise in advance if I waffle on too much.

First, a little about me.Photo of John Williams

I’m a lifelong strength athlete who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the summer of 2018.

I’ve trained for and competed in strength sports for most of my life - 45 years this year (I’m 55 at the moment). My first Olympic Lifting (the type of weightlifting they have at the Olympics) competition was in November 1974 and I went on to be a National Champion by the age of 16.

At the end of 1979 I competed in my first powerlifting competition, which is much more reliant on brute strength. Powerlifting is the squat, bench press and deadlift. A change is as good as rest so I had a go - the next Olympics in 1984 seemed so far away. I had every intention of going back to weightlifting.

I went on to be a multi British, European and World Champion across four weight classes and broke several World Records in the World Drug Free Powerlifting Federation. My last World title was in Russia in 2003, after which my body needed a rest but my need for endorphins runs deep so I switched back to weightlifting instead.

In 2004 I was British Masters (over 40) champion. I followed this up with a third place at the Welsh Open and first in the Welsh Masters. The next few years saw a number of operations, some of which were to repair the damage caused by years of long heavy training sessions and one or two to upgrade internal fixation I’d had put in years before following a motorcycle accident.

I’ve always been the sort of person who loves a challenge, even more so if someone has told me I wouldn’t be able to do it, so in 2009 I started the long road to the 2013 Masters Games. However, it was not to be and in 2012 I completely ruptured my right biceps at the shoulder and either ruptured or partially ruptured all four parts of my right rotator cuff (muscles in the shoulder). As far as recovery was concerned it was by far the most difficult injury/operation I’d had.

By the summer of 2014 I was back on the powerlifting platform representing Wales in the Four Nations Championships. My first competitive outing in a long time and I managed to break three British Masters Records, one of which had stood since 2000. During this time I even entered a strongman contest, a bucket list thing. I knew I had no chance of winning, the next oldest person was just over half my age but I managed to place top 3 in one event and actually won another. I was pleased I didn’t actually come last overall.

It was at this time that I began to notice it was taking longer to recover from workouts and my muscles ached far more than they should have. At first I put this down to 40 odd years of heavy training. I was still competing once, maybe twice a year and broke all the Welsh Masters Records in two weight classes and as I write I hold several open records across two weight classes as well.

My ability to train hard and recover was slowly but surely decreasing and by the beginning of 2018 I seemed to be constantly sore and was sustaining one injury after another – time for a visit to the doctors and a string of visits to the hospital.

Photo of John WilliamsOnce I got my diagnosis of multiple sclerosis it was a bit of a relief to be honest. It could have been something far worse and at least I could still go to the gym, albeit training very differently.

I’ve always tried to put something back into the sport I’ve enjoyed for so many years, promoting contests, refereeing, coaching and I currently edit the website for the Welsh Strength Association so once I’d settled into a training routine my thoughts turned to trying to use what I could do to raise a little money for MS and the only thing I could think of was lifting weights.

So, that brings us to what I’m doing. Phase one of my goal is to total 600kg over the three lifts (powerlifting) and to set Welsh Masters Records in each lift at the Welsh Cup on 03 March 2019. At the time of writing this I’m on course to it but as you can imagine it will depend on having enough good days to make progress, I am incredibly stubborn and driven though!

I picked MS UK because it offers support and is hands on in its approach to helping - you can see where the money goes!

I’ve opened a donation page for MS-UK on Facebook

Phase two of my goal will be more difficult – my plan is to return once again to Olympic lifting and compete in the Welsh Masters in November 2019 and hopefully raise a little more money.

We wish John lots of luck with his challenge!

If you’ve been inspired by John get in touch with Lucy to order your fundraising welcome pack today! Just email Lucy or call on 01206 226500.

If you feel ready to get going you can set up a Facebook fundraiser today!

Guest blog: Is a hand-controlled car right for you?

Posted on: February 04 2019

christian hand control car.jpgIn our latest guest blog, MSer Christian Rolfe talks about his new hand-controlled car and tells us what to expect from the assessment.

I've been on the Motability scheme some years now and in April 2018 I was driving an automatic with a hoist for our scooters. Normally when my licence expires I get a letter which I send back and a new licence arrives for 3 years, but this time I received a letter requesting I made an appointment for a medical to determine my fitness to drive.

The appointment was 10-15 minutes or so and I didn't get off my scooter nor was I examined. I was asked a few questions to measure my cognition. After the "physio" I was given 5 years on my licence instead of the normal 3. 

Having already gone from a manual to an automatic 3 years ago because my left foot and leg was giving up, now my right leg was feeling icy cold and a bit painful. This started last summer in the boiling heat.

Having had 4 or 5 near misses, my partner and I went on a cruise to New York and back. On the drive home from Southampton, the M20 was shut and the Satnav took me to another road that it didn't recognise. I was forced to go down a very narrow country lane and I crashed the car. I was going too fast and my right foot was unable to control my speed and would not respond to hit the brake.

I decided to contact Motability to ask about hand controls. They gave me a number of a place that does driving assessments. I was worried about the assessment but it was totally fine. I was given the sort of examination a neurologist would and then I drove their car. The type of hand control I have and was assessed on was a ball on the steering wheel for steering with your left hand and a push-pull lever for acceleration and braking operated by my right – you pull towards you to accelerate and push away to brake.

The assessment is as straightforward as can be although my very good looking but not equally functioning legs did want to get involved. I was taken out for around 20 minutes when they told me I was suitable. I received the report in the post a few days later. I think it said "world’s greatest driver" but I could be wrong…

After the assessment Motability will pay for you to have up to 6 lessons with the hand controls but it's up to you. Anyone thinking about hand controls needs to do it. There really is nothing to worry about!

Our helpline team are here to help...

You can email our helpline team with any questions you may have about Motability or driving with MS. 

Try this Nightshade-free Italian sauce recipe

Posted on: January 31 2019

Front cover image.jpgIn our latest blog, New Pathways Editor Sarah-Jane Lampe takes a look at the Autoimmune Protocol Diet (AIP) and shares this vegan Nightshade-free Italian sauce recipe to end Veganuary on a high!

Fancy adding more tasty AIP recipes to your kitchen collection? Read more in New Pathways Magazine.

 

Nightshade-free Italian sauce

Tomato sauce is a no-no on the AIP diet, but some meals simply scream for a big, bold red sauce. For the times when you simply must have tomato sauce, try this hearty “no tomato” red sauce.

 

Ingredients

 

1 (15-ounce, or 420g) can butternut squash puree

8 ounces (225g) cooked red beets, peeled and chopped

3 tablespoons (45ml) full-fat coconut milk

1 tablespoons (15ml) apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon (15ml) coconut aminos

2 teaspoons (1.5g) dried basil

2 teaspoons (1.5g) dried marjoram

1 ½ teaspoons (9g) fine sea salt

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon dried oregano

 

Prep time

8 minutes

 

Yield

3 cups (700 ml)

 

Directions

  1. Combine all the ingredients in a blender or food processor. Blend on high for about 30 seconds, until you obtain a smooth and creamy sauce. Check the seasoning and adjust the salt to taste.

  2. Store in a glass container and refrigerate until needed. Reheat on the stovetop over low heat, stirring frequently.

Notes

The sauce will keep, covered, in the fridge for up to five days. It freezes well. Serve with basil zucchini noodles.

 

Subscribe to New Pathways today for more tasty recipes!

Guest blog: The step by step guide to mastering a charity street collection!

Posted on: January 17 2019

aled and ennli street collect.jpgIn this guest blog, Aled and Enlli give us their pro tips for organising a street collection. Both of these amazing people are fundraising for MS-UK as they take on the Virgin Money London Marathon this year - thank you guys! So, read on for their top tips...

What is a street collection?

A street collection is a charity collection on a high street or shopping area. Collections are usually made using buckets. Learn how to stage your own street collection with this handy guide from seasoned pros Aled and Enlli!

Step one - Plan your application

In order to be able to organise a street collection you must first make an application to your local council.

You should look to make an application a month before the date you are hoping to do the collection.

Popular areas and dates (such as Christmas) may require an application to be completed further in advance.

Step two - Complete your application

The application form should be available on the council's website.

The application form for most councils will be in PDF or word document format which you will need to save before filling in. Make sure you have the most recent version of Adobe. The forms are usually straightforward, requiring information about yourself and the charity.

Most councils also require a letter of authenticity (LOA) to be submitted alongside the application. This proves to the council that you are raising money for charity. You can get a LOA from your charity of choice. If you are planning a street collection for MS-UK, you can get in touch with the MS-UK Fundraising Team using our online form.

Step three - Prepare yourself for the day ahead

Be early - You may not be the only street collector on the day. By arriving early you can make sure you can stand in the prime location and catch the early shoppers who can also be the most generous. 

Grab a great spot - It is very important to make sure you stand in a good location. Ideally you want to be placed in a busy place near popular shops.

Take a break -  Street collecting can be very tiring both physically and mentally. Take breaks and make sure you drink enough water.

Step four - Get creative!

aled and ennli street collect 2.jpgTry fancy dress -  Dressing up really helps. It can often draw people's attention and often brings a smile to young children. I (Aled) often wear my giraffe onesie or something festive. Before Christmas we organised a street collection in St Albans and we certainly drew attention to ourselves dressed up as elves!

Be active -  There is nothing worse than a disinterested collector! We never standing still when collecting. It keeps us warm and people always seem more likely to donate to those who look like they want to be there.

Grab some stickers! -  Having stickers with you can be very useful. Children really enjoy getting something in return. At our Christmas collection we gave out festive stickers to children and their parents often reached for a few extra pennies!

Handy extra information!

  • People may ask what your charity does. If you're raising money for MS-UK, make sure you are aware of the amazing work they do!

  • Tell your chosen charity before you start collecting. You should always email the charity before making an application for a street collection as a charity can only make one application in an area per year. 

  • Set up a Facebook page. If you are successful with an application, post about it on the Facebook page so others who live nearby can join in.

  • Don't shake the bucket! You are not allowed to shake your bucket when conducting a street collection.

  • Organising a street collection in central London tends to be very difficult. They need to be organised a long time in advance and usually by the charity itself.

  •  If you would like to collect outside a supermarket or shopping centre you may require extra permission from the manager in additional to the council license.

Good luck!

From Aled and Enlli

Fancy hosting a street collection for MS-UK? Get in touch with our fundraising team today!

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Guest blog: The things people say...

Posted on: January 16 2019

In this guest blog we hear from David, Chief Executive from Sportability, a British charity supporting people affected by paralysis to take part in sport...

'I’ve had a wonderful two months since joining Sportability. I feel that my life is beginning to start again with my MS no longer being a brick in my pocket!'

That quote came out quite naturally in a casual conversation with Mandy, at one of our sporting events. As a former journalist it resonated with me because of its utter simplicity and total authenticity. I was a professional writer and yet I could never have created, or even imagined, such a complete and vibrant description that in just a couple of word encapsulates what Mandy obviously felt as the restraining, the weighing down, effect of multiple sclerosis (MS).

Inspired by this we have recently been gathering simple profiles from various people who enjoy our events and activities. These are unscripted self-written comments, devoid of PR frippery and spin, but chock full of sincerity and an earthy originality. The results are truly revealing.

Photo of David with Trish, the Sporability patron
This is David with Trish Deykin, the patron of Sportability.

How about this as a powerful message from Roger, a 65 year old living in the Midlands. 'With MS there are two ways you can go, either switch off and wait for a cure or you can find a different way of living your life.  Like a river finding a new course.  Before my MS I was working 80 hours a week and doing very little else.  Since my diagnosis, I have travelled more, had more fantastic experiences, a lot of them with Sportability, certainly more than I ever would have had without my illness.'

Or the frank, honest, open-ness of Jen from East Anglia. 'Prior to suffering with MS, I had always been an outgoing, confident, professional individual. However, I became a very different person as my symptoms took hold, robbing me of all of this, as well as my identity. I found myself experiencing the very unfamiliar feeling of vulnerability, having a total lack of confidence and self-worth. My world became a very small place.'

But she goes on to reveal something of an MS metamorphosis. 'Then I was introduced to Sportability and wow, I haven't looked back! This enabled me to experience a variety of activities, such as gliding, quad-biking and sailing. It's a wonderful feeling to be in an environment where you feel safe, where you are accepted as you are and where people focus on what you can do, and not what you can't. I come away from a Sportability day with a big smile and feeling emotionally energized. My confidence has grown as I realise that there is an abundance of things out there that I can in fact do!'

They are only words, but how meaningful and heartfelt they are. And what insights and, dare I say it, inspiration, they evoke. It is the things that people say, like this, that make us do the things we do.

David Heard, Chief Executive of Sportability

Photo: David Heard and Trish Deykin. At the recent 2018 Sunday Times Sportswomen of the Year Awards Trish received The Helen Rollason Award for Inspiration. She is the current Triathlon European Champion, and has been for last two years. She is also a former World Champion.

Sportability logo imageDiscover Sportability

You can find out more about Sportability on their website, like them on Facebook or follow them on Twitter

Guest Blog: Race to the King...it started with a text

Posted on: January 11 2019

In this guest blog, Carly Soffe tells us about her gruelling grapple with the Race to the King ultra-marathon!Photo of Carly and Alister at the Race to the King challenge

I came out of a meeting in mid-January and had a text message from my good friend and Tysabri buddy’s husband, Alister... ‘Are you up for this?’ he said, sending a link to the Race to the King event, a 53 mile trail ultra-marathon.

I’d been running for about 8 months and had a few 10k and a half marathon runs under my belt, including the Brighton Marathon. I thought about it, albeit briefly, and replied ‘You know what? Yes! This sounds fun, happy to do it in a day too’. There was an option to do it over two days, but that was far too sensible…

And then I kind of forgot about it. I ramped up my training for Brighton and managed it in 4hr 30m. It was tougher than I’d hoped but I didn’t stick to my race plan and went too fast too soon. Alister assured me that a marathon was far harder than anything else I’d do… I was doubtful.

I signed up for a walking event, which the organiser agreed I could run if I was fully self-sufficient. So I ran 45km of trails on my 32nd birthday. Running offroad was a real eye opener. It took far longer than I expected but was really enjoyable and, as the only runner in a walking event, I won!

Alister was following a 12-week training program, but I was struggling. With a full time job, three dogs, multiple sclerosis (MS) and awful time management skills, I wasn’t getting the miles in. Seven weeks before the ultra, Alister and I hadn’t even run together – how were we going to manage 53 miles in each other’s company? I was starting to worry. As if he read my mind, Alister invited me to join him on a 13.1 training run around town. It went well but there was work to do. Not long after that, I managed to start using the program. It meant some early mornings and late nights, but soon I was racking up 25-40 miles per week, and Alister and I were running every Sunday together, exploring the South Downs between Chichester and Eastbourne. 

At this point we discussed fundraising. We should raise some money, but who for? I volunteered that I would like to raise money for MS-UK, and Alister could join me or choose another charity if he wanted to. I explained that the MS-UK website and chat rooms had been beneficial for me post diagnosis, and I’d like to support them. He was keen to join me, and the race begun!

Both of us are fortunate to have very supportive families, friendship groups and colleagues, and our JustGiving pages started seeing a lot of visitors. Whilst my close colleagues are aware that I have MS, it’s not common knowledge, and as I’m field based, I often don’t see people for months. Whilst my email was nonspecific, my JustGiving page was honest and held nothing back, which felt liberating. The email went to the entire business, and I let out a deep breath. Within minutes my inbox was full of kind, generous and supportive messages, some from people I knew reasonably well, and others who I’d only met once. It felt amazing.

Alister and I went on to raise around £1,700 each and proudly wore our MS-UK running vests as we took on the ultra-marathon on 23 June 2018. We set off from Slindon at 8.15am and ran (yes, we were still running) across the finish line in Winchester at just gone 10.30pm. It was an amazing experience and I genuinely enjoyed every minute of it. Our time was a little slower than hoped, but we had a headtorch malfunction, and both agreed we need to coordinate our toilet stops better in future. And yes, there is a ‘future’, Alister and I have only managed a few Parkruns together since but will be tackling at least one ultra-marathon in 2019 and aspire to complete a 100 mile ultra at some point.

Feeling inspired?

Discover ways to fundraise with MS-UK today!

Guest blog: Rocco's Mini Mudder!

Posted on: December 19 2018

In this guest blog, Rocco Guy Freedman, aged 8 years old, tells us all about his Mini Mudder challenge in aid of MS-UK...Photo of Rocco during the course

Photo of Rocco after the courseI absolutely loved the mini mudder, it was great. I loved doing this for the charity MS-UK, because my Grandpa has MS, and it was FUN! On the day I was very nervous. I saw the adults doing it. We went to the course and I got ready.

3…2…1…GO!

I was running as fast as I could. The first challenge was to get through the rope. We had to squeeze! We had the tunnels they were very slippery. Next we had the monkey swing, it was like the monkey bars, but our hands slipped. That was the hardest! Then we had to run really fast up a thing like a hill. We had the running and jumping in the MUD! I swam in it. That was the most fun challenge.

SUDDENLY I saw there was another challenge! I was so tired. We had to climb under the rope. We had to do the leopard crawl.  

I DID TEN LAPS OF THE COURSE!

I felt good for raising lots of money and I enjoyed telling people about MS-UK.

About Rocco's challenge

Mini Mudder is a 1 mile obstacle course mud run designed specifically for adventure-seeking kids. The course gives kids the chance to work as a team, get muddy, and experience the thrill of adventure. Rocco did this amazing challenge and raised over £100 in aid of MS-UK - every penny helps us to support even more people affected by mutliple sclerosis, so thank you Rocco!

Fundraisers of the month - Dan and Alex

Posted on: December 17 2018

This month, our fantastic fundraisers are Dan and Alex, who both did a skydive in aid of MS-UK recently. Here's their story of taking on 13,000 feet with their parents in mind...Photo of Dan and Alez

With both of us having parents who are sufferers of multiple sclerosis (MS), we both believed it would be important to try and raise money to help them as best we can. At first, we looked at participating in a triathlon, but on second thought believed we should do something more extravagant, and so turned to the idea of a skydive. We knew this would put us both outside our comfort zones and looked forward to the challenge. We collected donations for around three months prior to the jump, both setting a target of £500, with an overall goal of £1,000.

As you can imagine, at first both of us made a lot of money but after a while the donations began to dry up. Therefore, we took to advertising our JustGiving page on social media, sending it to friends and family. We also asked around our schools for donations, which contributed significantly. Our jump took place on 03 November at Hinton Skydiving Centre in Brackley.

Family and friends came along to support which was a big confidence boost due to a high level of nerves. We had our briefing, met our tandem jumpers, and set off on the fifteen-minute journey up to 13,000 ft. The journey up was the worst part because it came into perspective just how high we were jumping from. On the way up, we took in the view of Silverstone racetrack and had one final briefing before the long fall back to ground. Alex jumped first, and Dan went second.

Photo of skydiveBoth of us thoroughly enjoyed the experience and both genuinely believed it was the best of our lives. The feeling of falling is very hard to explain, but it's an amazing sensation like no other that fills you with high levels of adrenaline and excitement. We would thoroughly recommend a skydive to anyone thinking about doing one, the experience is so unique, and you will not regret it.

Photo of skyive

Overall, we are delighted to say to that both met out targets and ended with a total of £1,497. Once again, we would like to thank MS-UK for their unconditional support and we hope our money goes to a good cause.
Dan Wood and Alex Greene
Aged 17
Northampton

Visit Dan's JustGiving page

Visit Alex's JustGiving page

Feeling inspired?

Visit our web page to find out more about skydiving in aid of MS-UK today! You can also email Lucy or give us a call on 01206 226500.

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