Skip to main content

MS in the news

Posted on: October 02 2017

sarah-jane-300.jpgNot everyone has time to visit the news section on the MS-UK website every day (its ok, we forgive you), so here’s a summary of some of the latest developments in MS. 

I’ve got a gut feeling

Recently there has been a lot of news regarding gut bacteria, with some interesting studies highlighting how changes to gut bacteria could lead to a possible future treatments for MS.

Reading these stories, I found myself researching the different gut bacteria thinking maybe I should change my diet accordingly, but I quickly realised it’s not that simple.

More research is needed to get to treatment stages, but the signs are encouraging.

Click the stories below to read more about the latest developments.

And with tummies in mind, the latest issue of New Pathways magazine features a four-page feature about the Overcoming MS Recovery Program, one of a few popular diet choices for people with MS. Find out more by subscribing and why not try out the free recipe too? 

News for progressive MS

Scientists at Yale University have uncovered two closely related cytokines that may explain why some people develop progressive MS and could lead the way in developing a novel treatment to prevent progressive forms of the condition. Click here to read the news story.

Let’s talk genes

MS is not hereditary, but it is genetic and researchers at the University of Florida Health got everyone talking recently, when they revealed they had found a way to inhibit or reverse MS using a novel gene therapy technique that stops the condition’s immune response in mice.

Of the mice that received gene therapy, 80% went into near-complete remission after having hind-limb paralysis. This is a promising outcome, but more studies are needed.

Trial

Bexarotene, a drug that could help the brain regrow myelin in people with MS, has started its phase II clinical trial.

The trial is only open to people with relapsing MS who are currently on a disease modifying therapy (DMT). It will involve 50 people and the first person involved started their treatment in March.

Recruitment is taking place in Cambridge and Edinburgh, but not everyone will be eligible because of other important criteria.

The trial will run for four years to study the long-term benefits for people with MS.

For more information about the criteria for the trial click here. To access the trial you will need to be referred by your GP or neurologist

For more daily MS news, visit the MS-UK website.

Sarah-Jane

New Pathways Editor

Guest blog: MS Smart trial

Posted on: July 21 2017

In our latest guest blog Christian tell us about his experiences on the MS-SMART trial...

dsc00034.jpgIt all began in 2015 when I saw the advert for the trial, I felt a little/lot hopeless with being secondary progressive and not taking any medication to help as at this time there are no drugs to help. I read up on the trial and completed a short survey to check my suitability for the trial, obviously being such a specimen I passed that with flying colours. A phone call follows and I was on. The trial places me on one of three drugs or possibly a fourth being the placebo. The three drugs were Amiloride (used to treat heart disease), fluoxetine (used to treat depression) and riluzole (used in the treatment of motor neurone disease).

The first day of the trial was a trip to London (Queen and everything) for a 9am start at the University College London Institute of Neurology. I was signed up and asked if I could take part in two further parts of research, one was a photograph of the layers of my optic nerve (about 20 minutes, they think they can tell speed of progression from the thickness of the layers) and the other a lumbar puncture. At first I said no to the lumbar puncture as I’m a bit cowardly but after a comment by a doctor and an hour and 18 minutes in an MRI machine I guilt-ed myself into agreeing to do it. The MS Smart trial itself was measured by an eye test with invisible letters, a walk test, MRI, peg board and a few cognition tests. Unlike the tests my neurologist sets me these were some that I actually could do without looking like a total drunk and even one that I was very good at scoring 56, 58 and finally 60 out of 60 so improving each year.

It was a long day and I think I drove home early evening. I had to return every month for a blood test and to pick up my tablets, after 6 months it reduced to every 3 months and after a year every 6 months. I live in Maidstone, Kent so it was a real day out in London for me. The tests were repeated after 1 year and on completion (2 years). In my naive mind I thought I would find out what drug I’d been taking for 2 years on my last visit but the last person does not finish their 2 years until April 2018, the results then take at least 6 months to work out so it could be 2019/20 before I find out. The nurses that took my blood and checked my tablets were fantastic, even Tiggy who made me scream like a howling banshee doing me a favour using a big needle to save time on taking blood as she needed extra. Ouch.

If I had the chance of doing it all again I would, the only real problem I had was relating to the second lumbar puncture which left me with a headache like brain freeze that lasted for a full week. I felt low after finishing my two years and the stopping of the tablets I was on, this is either a side effect of stopping the tablets or more likely just a feeling of no longer trying to stop my multiple sclerosis, I don’t like having no control.

The outcome of the trial was never to fix me but to delay or even halt the progression. I feel the same but progression is so slow I didn’t notice playing football one day to today bouncing off walls .

They are about to embark on a new trial using Statins, I was asked if I would like to do that too. We will see…

You can find out more about the MS-SMART trial on the MS Society website at www.mssociety.org.uk/ms-research/treatments-in-the-pipeline/ms-smart. Please note that this is an external site.

Live Chat Software by Click4Assistance UK