Skip to main content

Diet, exercise, meditation

Posted on: July 20 2021

by Martin Baum Martin 24.5.21.jpg

Recently, I was invited to be a contributor for a Q&A article about staying active with MS. Although I have blogged extensively about living life not MS – an issue which connects positively with the many MSers who follow me - this was the first time I had specifically been asked my thoughts about exercise and exercising.

In so far as it goes for one man and his stick, my idea of a physical workout is being taken to the local park by my wife/carer as regularly as my health and the weather dictates. What else was there for me to contribute? Well, as it turned out, quite a lot more than I had initially given myself credit for and this is how.

Aside from my limited bodily activity, I try to do the best I can. It is all about keeping to a regular routine, pretty much the same as for anyone else going to a gym. As any MSer can attest, with something as demotivating as this energy-sapping, soul-destroying illness, it is just so easy not to bother.  Some say 'What is the point? I cannot do it. I will not do it. I have MS!'

However, I can and do because there is a point. It is called structure, setting goals. Mine was taking a daily walk of a modest distance which inadvertently, led to an unexpected change in my diet. It didn’t just happen. It wasn’t MS, it was me. Eating too many of the wrong things was causing me to gain weight, making me breathless sometimes and causing a dip in my energy levels. I knew I had to do something.

I call it the Rocket Science diet or, rather, it isn’t. Whilst I wasn’t a great consumer of 'treats' per se, such as bread, biscuits, crisps, chocolate or alcohol for example, I decided to eliminate everything except fish, meat, fruit, vegetables and water from my diet on an ongoing trial basis. Has it been easy? Well, yes, given that this was something I felt was necessary in my limited capacity for taking responsibility for my health and welfare.  It’s also given yet more structure to my life. More goals to achieve.

However, there was something else which I unintentionally neglected to include in the article - meditation, which was something I had already been doing for some time and was inextricably a major part of my daily structure. 

MS is a sponge which just keeps absorbing and can leave MSers vulnerable, both physically and emotionally. I am no exception. Meditation, though, helps me achieve mental clarity, focus and, to quote Pink Floyd, “comfortably numb”. Since I have begun practising meditation, I believe I can stay one step ahead of MS or, at the very least, keep abreast of it.

Whilst I accept the combined holy trinity of diet, exercise and meditation is not for everyone, I passionately believe that doing something is better than nothing be it diet, exercise, or meditation. Take your pick. Think of it as living life on your terms instead of being at the behest of the life limiting conditions set down by MS.

Failure is Not an Option is a phrase associated with the Apollo 13 Moon landing mission and it should be something for all MSers to aspire to. By doing something is one less thing for a carer, physio, therapist, or neurologist to take responsibility for. To put it more succinctly, if an MSer cannot at least try to do the best they can for themselves, then why should anyone else?

It’s your MS, own it.

Making sure I exercise - Jon's story

Posted on: July 14 2021

Jon Dean has always been a fan of exercise and sport. When he recieved his multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis, he thought he could no longer do the things he loved. Here's his story... Jon Dean.jpg

Exercise, they say it’s good for you. Throw MS into the mix and it can feel like an impossible task at times. I was always a keen footballer in my teens, I wasn’t particularly good but I loved to play and worked hard to get better. As a goalkeeper, I loved making saves. MS has made my hands constantly numb and one of the worse things for a goalkeeper is to lose their grip. So despite a few attempts to play since I was diagnosed 11 years ago, the gloves and boots will have to remain hung up.

My other fitness passions were going to the gym and running. I had to give up my gym membership 11 years ago as we needed the money due to moving home and our first child was on the way. After years of going to the gym six to seven times a week, I was no longer exercising and my neurologist believes that, and the stress of moving triggered my MS diagnosis. I don’t regret that decision as it could’ve happened regardless and being a parent is the greatest accomplishment in my life.

But 'use it or lose it' has often resonated with me so when things improved financially, I returned to the gym. It was tough. Over a year off, I’d lost so much strength and the added symptom of fatigue made even a 30 minute workout near impossible.

I persisted. I’m glad I did as I’m a fan of playing the long game, my patience is pretty good and eventually I started to feel fitter. Fitness improving with exercise is obvious I know but MS fatigue is something worse than just feeling out of shape so when I started to notice my fatigue had lessened, my morale was in a really good place.

Fast forward to 2016 and whilst I was watching the London Marathon like I do every year, I had always dreamt of taking part but wrote off my chances due to my MS. The commentator then said “if you’re ever sitting there watching and thinking you want to take part but can’t, just apply and see what happens” so that’s what did. One year later I fulfilled a lifelong dream and thankfully the cameras didn’t catch my ugly crying face when I crossed the finish line! I’m so glad I pushed myself.

Four years later I’m still running two to three times a week and still going to the gym five to six times a week. I’ve got RRMS and I feel lucky that I can still do most of the things I did before my diagnosis as one day, things might worsen and I have to look for a different form of exercise. I truly believe finding an exercise that you enjoy can help you mentally as well as physically and my MS is in a good place as a result of that.

I’ll keep going, keep on running and keep making sure I exercise.

Want to learn more about managing your MS? Check out Dr Hawley's information sessions

Posted on: June 03 2021

Do you ever wonder if you’re doing the appropriate exercises to help you reach your goals? Or maybe you’re wondering if improving your strength and mobility is even possible with a progressive condition like MS? Headshot.jpg

The information sessions with Dr Gretchen Hawley, will not only answer those questions, but they’ll leave you feeling empowered and informed. You’ll understand the process your brain goes through to create new neural connections, resulting in improved strength and movement. You’ll also learn appropriate exercises and techniques to improve your balance and muscle tightness, leading to better function in your day-to-day activities.

Dr Gretchen Hawley is a physiotherapist and Multiple Sclerosis Certified Specialist. Her expertise in MS-specific exercise and wellness strategies often result in her clients feeling more control over their MS. Her tools and strategies are easy to understand and implement into your daily routine.

The sessions covered so far have reviewed neuroplasticity and brain changes with exercise, how to exercise to improve your mobility, fatigue management, and spasticity management.

If you would like to know more about our upcoming information session by Dr Hawley, please click here.

Stuffed Aubergines recipe - National Vegetarian Week

Posted on: May 10 2021

This week, 10-16 May is National Vegetarian Week. Diet can have an impact on multiple sclerosis, and some people use it as a way to contribute to the management of the condition. Click here to read more about diet and supplements with our Choices booklet. Here, this recipe for stuffed aubergines is a great swap packed with protein and tasty vegetables for a meat-free meal. Why not give it a go this week? STUFFED AUBERGINES .jpg

Stuffed aubergines

Serves 6

  • 4 large aubergines
  • olive oil
  • 100g quinoa
  • 250ml boiling water
  • 150g sun-dried tomatoes in oil, roughly chopped, plus 2 tbsp of oil from the jar
  • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 3 tbsp pine nuts
  • 1 tbsp harissa paste
  • large handful of parsley, about 15g, roughly chopped
  • salt and pepper

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 220°C fan. Cut the aubergines in half and place on to a baking tray. Score the flesh with a knife (being careful not to cut all the way through), drizzle with olive oil and salt, and roast for 35-40 minutes until soft. Once soft, remove from the oven and leave to cool.

2. Turn the oven down to 180°C fan. While the aubergines are in the oven, cook the quinoa. Place a medium saucepan over a medium heat and add the quinoa and boiling water. Bring to a simmer and cook for 12–15 minutes until the water has been absorbed. Once cooked, remove from the heat and leave to one side until cool.

3. Using a large spoon, scrape the flesh out of the aubergines and on to a board. Roughly chop into pieces then put into a large bowl. Add the tomatoes, balsamic vinegar, pine nuts, harissa and quinoa. Season with a large pinch of salt and pepper.

4. Using a tablespoon, scoop equal amounts of the mixture back into each aubergine skin. Place them back on the baking tray and bake in the oven for 20 minutes. Sprinkle the parsley on top before serving. 

From Deliciously Ella Quick & Easy: Plant-based Deliciousness by Ella Mills (Yellow Kite, £19.99).

Foot drop exercise masterclass with Alan Pearson

Posted on: May 07 2021

It is a pleasure to be able to put together a series of masterclasses around exercise and education in MS. I spend a lot of time working and educating people around their symptoms and seeing the effects that MS has on their bodies, whether walking, sitting or tasks of daily living. By helping people have better knowledge and understanding about their MS symptoms, it allows people to have more independence and improve their quality of life. Alan headshot 3.jpg

As a Level 4 Exercise Coach for Long term Neurological Conditions, I have been working with people with MS and other neurological conditions for the past nine years and if you have been following our online classes or joined in one of the many information sessions from our fellow professionals, you will be building a wealth of understanding that will help you on a day to day level, reduce symptoms and help maintain a more stable condition. 

People with MS experience different symptoms with their condition from muscle weakness, fatigue, spasms, numbness/ tingling, difficulty walking, coordination, balance issues, are just a few symptoms associated with MS.  One of the many symptoms I am asked about is foot drop, the inability to lift the toes and flex the foot at the ankle. Many of you may have found yourself walking normally and then after some time your foot starting to drag or catch on the floor, maybe having more trips and falls, a high stepping gait or throwing the leg out to the side when trying to walk.  

During the next masterclass, I will address some of these areas and demonstrate some exercises that can be beneficial for foot drop. I will talk about types of equipment that can be used like foot drop stimulators and foot orthosis that assist for the foot drop condition.  

The exercises will help to support a better functional capacity and help maintain a more neutral foot position. We will also look at the global effects that it has on the rest of the body when sitting, standing and walking itself.   

If you like the sound of this masterclass, please come and join us!  To register for the session, please click here. There is a suggested donation of £5, but you can donate any amount from £1 to attend.  

MS-UK exercise masterclasses

Posted on: March 31 2021

Every month, our online masterclasses offer insight to different topics and special areas of interest that have been suggested by participants who attend our exercise classes. The masterclasses complement our weekly online exercise classes which take place every Tuesday and Thursday from 11am. The aim of each masterclass is to focus on a chosen topic area that people have identified as needing to know more about. 

The masterclasses are led by Alan Pearson, our level four exercise specialist who has nearly a decade of experience providing exercise prescription as a means of managing the symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Alan structures each masterclasses to first provide the understanding behind the theory of a problem such as foot drop and then demonstrates techniques to help manage the issues experienced through the use of exercise.  Alan headshot 3.jpg

Our next masterclass is on Friday 16 April at 11am, which is second in the series of our online masterclasses where we will be focusing on corrective stretching. If you would like to know more about the session or how to register, click here.   

See below some of the feedback we have received from our masterclasses that have taken place so far

“I thought the session was nothing less than brilliant. So practical, so reassuring, and so understanding. Alan is amazing.” – Jackie 

“Alan's balance masterclass was excellent. I can't tell you how very helpful it is to get these insights into how our brains and bodies work together and the effects that damage can have and how we can work to maintain and improve those links. They are really motivational too.” - Sarah 

“It’s so helpful to learn about what’s going on in the brain and body and to understand more about the links between them. It’s obvious that Alan knows his stuff.” - Lisa 

 

Book a masterclass session 

The relationship between diet and MS

Posted on: March 22 2021

A healthy and balanced diet is essential for everyone, and as March is National Nutrition Month, we’re sharing how diet can affect multiple sclerosis (MS).

Many people use their diet to complement other therapies, and there’s no ‘one size fits all’ approach to managing MS. Typically, inflammatory foods are known to be a trigger to the gut and result in a sometimes unhealthy gut microbiome, which can worsen the symptoms of MS. Whilst inflammation generally is the body’s barrier against infection, for people living with MS, it can be painful and ongoing as the myelin neurons are incorrectly recognised as pathogens, thus the inflammation continues and oxidation results in damaged cells.

However, your food choices can impact the levels the inflammation and can be a way to control the way in which your gut reacts. Fruit, vegetables, oily fish, and nuts and seeds are great direct anti-inflammatory foods. iStock-1186938002.jpg

Click here to find out the benefits of each diet 

Several diets have been specifically designed for people living with MS. There’s the Overcoming MS (OMS) diet, The Swank Diet, the Wahls Protocol, and the Best Bet Diet, to name the most notable options.

Read more about diet and supplements 

The OMS Diet is one of the most popular amongst MSers that are using diet to help manage their health, and it follows a largely plant-based diet, with the addition of fish. It is built from the foundations of the Swank Diet, which encourages a low consumption of saturated fats. Kellie Baron reveals how the OMS Diet helped her MS after she was diagnosed with MS in 2013.

At the time Kellie was working part-time due to fatigue and other MS-related symptoms. Several relapses eventually led to diagnosis, by which time she had just discovered OMS through a random Google search of the exact words ‘Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis’. She attended Professor Jelinek’s one-day conference in Brighton in 2013 where she learned all about the OMS Recovery Program, and the science behind it, and adopted the recommendations immediately.

“The diet was a huge change because I was eating absolute rubbish before that, lots of meat, dairy and saturated fat,” she said. “But it was like a switch went on in my mind. I don’t miss the old way of eating. I’m cooking a lot now which I never used to do before, and I’m eating amazing food.”

Since adopting the OMS way of life, and choosing to take the disease modifying drug Copaxone, Kellie has remained relapse free and seen improvement in her general health. Her Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score has dropped from 2.5 down to 1, with blurry vision in one eye her only remaining symptom.

“I’m back at work full-time now, have had promotions, and I’ve run a triathlon and cycled 100 miles,” she said. “The fatigue has gone, the numbness has gone, and I’ve had no more relapses. It has made such a huge difference to my life.”

There are also similar stories like Kellie’s from followers of The Best Bet Diet and Wahls Protocol, but one thing they all have in common is reduced fat and clean eating.

For more detailed information about these MS diets you can download our free Choices booklet surrounding the topic of diet and supplements. Always consulting your GP, neurologist and MS nurse before making any changes to any disease modifying drugs.

 

Introducing MS-UK Online

Posted on: January 18 2021

Dean.JPGDean Jeffreys, Online Programmes and Project Manager, explains MS-UK’s new national service and why you should get involved

Hello! I am the newly appointed online programmes and project manager here at MS-UK. I have the pleasure of launching our new and exciting online service for 2021. I have been working at MS-UK for just over three years now, and I will be using this experience to deliver and offer a wide range of online activities for the multiple sclerosis (MS) community.

This year, we will begin by launching our online exercise classes that are accessible for all abilities, and showing you how to get the most out of exercising from home. In addition, we will be starting other new classes and courses that will be the core offering from MS-UK. This includes mindfulness courses, chair yoga sessions, and our peer support service that will help you connect and stay socially active with others.

As we move forward in the year, we will be adding many more activities that you can get involved in. This includes live information sessions on topic areas such as diet and nutrition, symptom management, and complementary therapies. We will also offer alternative activities to those that get you physically active, including sessions on things such as poetry classes and arts and crafts.

As with everything we do at MS-UK, it is community-led, so if you have suggestions for activities you would like to see us hold online, you can email us register@ms-uk.org and tell us what activities you would like to see in the future.

FB photo Alan.jpgOnline exercise classes

Starting in January 2021, we have our new online exercise classes, with six classes taking place every week on a Tuesday and Thursday from 11am. The classes are structured in a way that will make them accessible for all.

The classes themselves have been specifically designed to help people stay active at home, and will be delivered by our Exercise Specialist, Alan Pearson. These classes will give you the confidence to manage your wellbeing independently by attending the classes and practising the exercises in your own time.

How the classes are structured

  • Level one (11-11:30am) will focus on exercises for those who are seated, have trunk (core) weakness and have limited upper limb movement
  • Level two (11:45am-12:15pm) will be for those who can transfer from sitting to standing independently but may require assistance or the use of a walking aid
  • Level three (12:30-1pm) for those who mobilise independently with minimal impairment

Find out more

Please visit our website page www.ms-uk.org/ms-uk-online to see what we have going on and to book a class. If you have any questions and would like to know more about what we are offering, please email register@ms-uk.org or call MS-UK on 01206 226500.

Thank you for reading and I hope to see you in a class with us soon!

Warming, healthy winter soups

Posted on: October 28 2020

cauliflower.jpgThese simple, veg-packed soups make perfect warming winter lunches

Cauliflower and coconut soup

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 small onion, peeled and chopped

1 small garlic clove, peeled and chopped

3 tbsp (45 ml) olive oil

½-in. (1-cm) piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated

1 small cauliflower, washed and chopped

1⅔ cups (400 ml) water

⅓ cup (80 ml) coconut milk

Salt and pepper

To serve

1½ tsp gomasio

3½ tbsp (20g) cedar pine nuts

 

Method

Cook the onion and garlic in a little of the olive oil in a large saucepan over low heat, until the onion is translucent. Add the ginger and cook for 1–2 minutes, until golden.

Add the cauliflower and remaining olive oil and cook until lightly colored.

Pour in the water, bring to a boil, and season with salt and pepper. Lower the heat and simmer gently until the cauliflower is cooked. Blend with the coconut milk to make a smooth, creamy soup. Serve the soup hot in bowls, sprinkled with the gomasio and cedar nuts.

 

kale.jpgKing kale soup

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 small yellow onion, peeled and chopped

1 garlic clove, peeled and chopped

1 tbsp (15 ml) olive oil

1 medium-sized head broccoli (about 14 oz./400 g), washed and chopped

About 10 kale leaves, washed and shredded

3¾ cups (880 ml) water

⅓ cup (80 ml) coconut milk

Salt and pepper

To serve

Green scallion (spring onion) tops, washed and very finely chopped

Edible flowers, washed

Method

Cook the onion and garlic in half the olive oil in a large saucepan over low heat, until softened but not colored. Increase the heat to medium-high and cook for 1–2 minutes, until the onion is golden.

Add the broccoli and kale to the saucepan with the rest of the olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and cook for a couple of minutes.

Pour in the water, bring to a boil, and simmer until the vegetables are tender. Add the coconut milk and blend everything together to make a smooth, creamy soup. Serve the soup hot, topped with chopped scallion tops and edible flowers.

 

Extracted from Wild Recipes: Plant-Based, Organic, Gluten-Free, Delicious by Emma Sawko (Flammarion, 2020).

Photography © Greta Rybus

Introducing MS-UK's Facebook Live accessible exercise classes every Tuesday and Friday!

Posted on: July 10 2020

Accessible exercise class Tuesday and Friday.pngOn Tuesday 14 July MS-UK will be launching our national exercise classes on Facebook Live specifically designed for those with multiple sclerosis (MS). Each week we will be hosting two live classes via Facebook. This will include an upper-body class on Tuesdays and lower-body class on Fridays both at 1pm.

The classes are designed to be accessible and inclusive for all. Both classes will be broken down and an alternative exercise demonstrated to ensure participation for all clients regardless of the individual’s ability.

The sessions will last approximately 30 minutes and will be delivered by MS-UK’s Wellness Coaches. Our Wellness Coaches are Level 4 exercise specialists who have over 13 years’ experience working with our clients in MS-UK’s wellness centre. The session will focus on correctional exercises, co-ordination, balance, mobility and strengthening exercises. The exercises performed during the class will offer the opportunity to take away from the class and be performed independently.

Sessions structure

-           Intro

-           Warm-up

-           Main session (neural engagement, co-ordination, strength and stability)

-           Cardiovascular (pulse raiser)

-           Cooldown

Some equipment can be used during the classes that you will find around the home. These include two food cans (or light gym weights (1-2kg max) if you have them), bath towel, walking stick/broom handle and carrier bag.

How to join us on Facebook

If you already have a Facebook profile you just need to search @MultipleSclerosisUK or click this link www.facebook.com/MultipleSclerosisUK/ to visit our Facebook page at 1pm on your chosen day. The live feed will appear on our profile page. If you do not have a Facebook account you can set one up by following these instructions.

Pages