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7 mental health myths busted

Today is World Mental Health Day and our MS-UK Counselling team are looking at common mental health myths head on…

Myths and beliefs about mental health issues can be instilled in us from an early age. These myths and beliefs are not designed to harm – they are passed to us in good faith mainly from parental figures, care givers and the environment in which we develop. These myths are designed to protect us from emotional issues rather than support us. The result is that we learn how to suppress our emotions rather than express them. Here are some common myths we often come across as counsellors with MS-UK…

Myth 1 - Mental health problems are rare

Mental health problems are widespread. According to Time to Change, around one in four people will experience a mental health problem each year and they can affect people from every walk of life.

Myth 2 - I can’t do anything to support someone with a mental health problem

The simple response here is, yes you can!

  • Check in

Ask how somebody is doing. It’s highly unlikely that you will make things worse. In fact, it may be that your relative, friend or colleague needs to talk to somebody and you ask them how they are doing helps them to open up about how they are feeling

  • Listen and try not to judge them

People want to feel heard. You offering a listening ear can often help more than you realise. Try not to judge what the person is saying, even though what you are hearing may be shocking. They are being brave talking to you

  • Treat them in the same way

Sometimes the person may feel worried or feel embarrassed about what they may have shared with you and wonder how you are going to act around them going forward. Try and treat them in the same way as you did before they opened up to you

  • Ask twice

It is OK to ask if somebody wants to talk more than once. It may be that the first time you asked them they didn’t feel able or ready to talk but they feel able to talk now

Myth 3 - People experiencing mental health problems aren’t able to work

People living with mental health problems can hold down a successful job. If one in four people experience a mental health problem each year these statistics suggest that in fact we probably all work with someone who is experiencing a mental health problem.

Myth 4 - People with mental health problems can’t recover

People can and do recover from mental health conditions and recovery means being able to live, work, learn and participate in the community. There is lots of different support and help available to help people recover.

Mental health problems may not go away forever but lots of people with mental health problems still work, have families and friends, engage in hobbies and interests and lead full lives.

These websites offer support:

www.rethink.org

www.mind.org.uk

www.samaritans.org

Myth 5 - People living with mental health conditions are usually violent and unpredictable

Most people living with mental health conditions are not violent. In fact, somebody with mental illness is actually more likely to be a victim of violence than to inflict it. According to Time to Change, the movement working to end mental health discrimination, the majority of violent crimes are committed by people who do not have mental health problems. It also states people with mental health problems pose more of a danger to themselves than to others, with 90% of people dying through suicide having experienced mental distress.

Myth 6 - Young people just go through ups and down as part of puberty – it doesn’t mean anything

One in eight young people experience a mental health problem, according to the NHS’s Mental Health of Children and Young People 2017 report. This statistic is widely thought to just be the tip of the iceberg. You may find it helpful to look at the charity, Young Minds. Visit www.youngminds.org.uk/.

Myth 7 - People with mental health problems are lazy and should try harder to snap out of it

This is not true. There are many reasons why someone may have a mental health problem and being lazy or weak is not one of them. People cannot just snap out of a mental health problem and many people may need help to get better. This help may include counselling, medication, self help and support from friends and family.

Mental health and multiple sclerosis

Depressive disorders occur at high rates among patients with MS and this can have a major, negative impact on quality of life for people living with multiple sclerosis, according to a study. However, counselling can be helpful in finding ways to talk about thoughts and feelings associated with MS.

Find out more about MS-UK Counselling today.