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“I don’t have to make a mess of the music in church anymore”

nina picx22.jpgNina Pearce discusses her journey since diagnosis

I know that my multiple sclerosis (MS) probably began when I was 30 and had just had my second child. I had optic neuritis, where there was a big blank splodge in the vision of one of my eyes. It got better with no treatment and no mention of MS. I thought I had had a stroke as the left side of my face was numb.

I wasn’t very sympathetically told I had MS, nor of any treatments. That was left to the fortunately much more understanding MS nurses who told me what type of MS I had and the treatment for pain and spasms I get.

Progression

I was OK for about three or four years, then my condition began to develop and my balance got much worse. My dominant left hand developed a tremor, so it was a relief that I retired from teaching in 2014 as I couldn’t write any more – marking books was out of the question.

I used to play the piano, organ, violin, trombone and guitar, but even playing the organ in church can no longer happen. Fortunately my husband retired as a vicar so we moved permanently to the bungalow we bought when I was still teaching. We are in a new area and I don’t have to make a mess of the music in church any more.

Welcome support

I have found MS-UK invaluable for support and help. In spite of COVID, the online gym sessions and the classes such as seated yoga are immensely enjoyable and I would suggest that anyone should take part. If you look on their YouTube channel here you may find more activities to join in with.

My mum has had relapsing remitting MS for about 60 years and counting. She refuses to use a rollator and begrudgingly uses one stick. I grew up having to do more in the home than many of my friends, something I tried to tell my children about as they were growing up!

I need my rollator in the home and to get to the car, or my new mobility scooter and not forgetting my tricycle. We have completed 1,200 miles so far this year. I cannot balance on an ordinary bike anymore. My husband helps push me up the more steep hills, and we try to do four and a half miles a day.

We look after our youngest granddaughter one day a week and I’m very glad that the government has said grandparents can do childcare. This has meant that we can also be on hand to pick up any of our other grandchildren from school, which we enjoy a great deal.