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Essex businesses raise over £16,000 working 9 to 5 for MS-UK!

Posted on: November 29 2018

Team Photo cheering .JPGCongratulations to all the businesses across Essex who celebrated their fundraising success at our 925 Challenge awards night on 22 November! Thanks to their hard work and dedication, they managed to raise an astounding £16,700 for people affected by multiple sclerosis (MS)!

Back in September, MS-UK officially launched our first ever 925 Challenge. Nine teams of local companies were handed countdown clocks and tasked with raising £925 before the timer ticked down to the end of 9 weeks, 2 days, and 5 hours.

The challengers - comprised of teams from NatWest, Charles Derby Financial Services, Team Pivotal, Ellisons Solicitors, OPM Response, Whitehall Electrical, White Hart, Push Energy and Direct Solutions - fought to be the first to reach the fundraising target by bringing the workplace together and getting creative.

As each team grappled to get the upper hand, the fundraising events became more and more innovative. We saw a 'dawn to dusk' golf day, a Swimathon, video game characters tackling an obstacle course, a car wash, a race night, and so much more!

The ideas were so good that once the clocks stopped we struggled to pick our final award winners!

After some tough deliberation we came to our decisions. The awards for ‘most money raised’ and the ‘team spirit award’ were scooped by the White Hart pub in West Bergholt who raised an incredible £6,000 by involving the community in their fundraising efforts.

Other awards went to Ellisons Solicitors for their quirky ‘Wacky Hat Wednesday’ event, OPM Response for their outstandingly fun fundraising films, and Direct Solutions for their innovative ‘Display for MS-UK’ initiative. As well as great team work, MS-UK recognised some individuals who went above and beyond during the challenge including 6 year old Shara Stevens who individually raised £300 and swam over a mile during local business networking group Team Pivotal’s Swimathon.

Collectively teams in our first corporate challenge raised a wonderful £16,700, which smashed our target of £10,000. We are delighted with the energy and enthusiasm all teams have shown for the challenge bringing colleagues, clients and customers together to raise both awareness and much needed funds for MS-UK.

Managing fatigue

Posted on: November 28 2018

In this blog, our MS-UK Helpline take a look at fatigue...

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Our Choices leaflets are available online

Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and it can often feel overwhelming during the cold and dark winter months. However, with the help of the MS community, we’ve gathered together a few tips and techniques that may help you through!  

Firstly, though it may seem counter-intuitive, moderate exercise has been shown to improve resistance to fatigue. Now, we are by no means suggesting that you run a marathon, but a small amount of regular walking, swimming, or yoga, among many other options, could make a positive difference in the longer term. For more information on exercise, please see our Choices leaflet.

Looking after your mental wellbeing is also important. Activities like meditation, mindfulness and relaxation, as well as just being aware of the need to factor in time for rest, are tips that the MS community have shared with us in relation to managing symptoms. This self-aware approach is particularly useful when it comes to fatigue because taking the time to plan activities and daily patterns, as well as breaking down tasks into manageable chunks, can really make things less daunting on a day-to-day basis.

It may seem like a bit of cliché, but we can hardly talk about the usefulness of exercise without also talking about healthy eating. It is well known that eating a balanced diet helps people to maintain good health and feel their best, while poor diet can lead to fatigue. This is no less true when it comes to MS. Supplements, including B12, Co-enzyme Q10, Vitamin D and Omega 3, can also contribute to reducing fatigue, though we suggest speaking to your GP or neurologist before taking anything new. For more information, please see our Choices leaflets on Diet and nutrition and Vitamin D.

Other therapies that some people with MS have found to be helpful include acupuncture, oxygen therapy, and Action Potential Simulation (APS) therapy. Oxygen therapy is widely used across the UK in the many MS therapy centres and those who regularly attend sessions have found that it can greatly improve fatigue levels. To find your nearest therapy centre, use our website.

You can read and download all of our Choices leaflets on our website

Fundraisers of the month - Karen and Maxine

Posted on: November 27 2018

Back in October Karen Shergold and Mazine Nunn took on the Royal Parks Half Marathon in aid of MS-UK. Here they tell us why fundraising for multiple sclerosis is so important to them…Photo of Karen and Maxine

‘Our sister and cousin, Nicola, 48 year old mother of three, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in 2017. 

‘Obviously such a diagnosis came as a shock to us all. From the beginning the support she has received from MS-UK has been tremendous. It gave her a forum to discuss her fears and engage with people who also have MS. In turn, it continues to give her strength and courage and is empowering her to live her life to the fullest.

‘Through Nicola we heard about the MS-UK sponsored places at the Royal Parks Half Marathon and as runners, it was an obvious way for us to give back, do an activity that we love, make a difference...all in all, a win-win situation.  

‘Out the outset, as busy people, we wanted to keep our fundraising efforts simple to achieve our target of £800.

‘We canvassed family for their suggestions on how best to raise the money and the consensus was very much in favour of fundraising activities rather than just donations. This enabled us to bring our family and friends together and the desire to have some fun along the way!

‘We agreed our two events would be a garden tea party and a quiz to make the most of the lovely summer we had this year. Both activities exceeded our expectations – you can see we raised an amazing amount on our fundraising page!

‘The key challenge for us was to ensure that our guests at both events went away feeling they had an enjoyable experience and the £10 fee was good value. Feedback from both events exceeded our expectations, with suggestions we should set up our own afternoon tea business and turn the quiz into an annual event.

‘We smashed our target and raised approximately £1,200, which enabled us to spend the latter two months focusing on training for the race.  

‘Both of us came away from this experience feeling a sense of pride in achieving some personal physical targets (we both set a new personal best) and in our own small way we have made a difference.

‘So what’s next? We are delighted to be volunteer stewards for the upcoming Colchester Half Marathon and looking to engage as many family members. Maybe we will see you there!

Karen and Maxine

Karen and Maxine’s top fundraising tips...

  • Start early – although we had 6 months, we planned our events 2 – 3 months in advance of the race to ensure that we had enough time in case we needed to raise additional funds
  • Do your research – our two activities were based on feedback on what people said they would enjoy, which meant that half the battle was won 
  • Good planning and organisation – a sense of humour and excellent delegation skills  
  • Spread the load – we were able to delegate key parts of these activities to willing family members
  • Keeping it simple – as we said above – focus on fewer but better quality activities
  • Don’t underestimate the need to continue to canvass support

Aids, adaptations and 'life hacks'...

Posted on: November 20 2018

Hello,

On Wednesday 14 November we held an information session about aids and adaptations at Josephs Court, our wellness centre based in Essex. We had a range of professionals talking about their role and what can support people to make daily challenges and tasks easier.

At the event our guest OT students, Ciara and Lauren, provided a handout of 'life hacks' - suggestions to make daily activities easier. Examples included magnetic shoe laces, using elastic bands to improve the grip on opening a jar, Velcro to hold items in place and suggestions for food preparation to help in areas like the kitchen. Download the PDF version of the handout

First up was Sam Hemmings an Occupational Therapist (OT) from the local Physical and Sensory Impairment Team. Sam spoke about the OT process and how it focuses on a client centred approach to address difficulties the person may have in their daily activities. This includes structuring of a client’s activities, managing behaviours, relationships and also the provision of equipment.

Essex Cares Limited (ECL) presented on the range of equipment they are able to prescribe following a referral. When a member of the ECL team attends a visit they are able to prescribe minor adaptations such as grab rails or bathroom equipment at the time of visit. They also spoke about their independent living centre located in Witham, Essex that is essentially a model home set-up where different equipment can be trialled and the client can see if a piece of equipment will benefit them.Aids and adaptations speakers photo

REMAP, who are a voluntary organisation made up of retired engineers and other technical backgrounds, demonstrated a wide range of bespoke adaptations and gadgets they can design for individuals. These are usually created to fill the gap where off the shelf adaptations do not fulfil the needs of the client. Such examples include a remote controlled powered wheelchair that returns to the user’s house once they had got into their car and another example included a double sided peg that meant a client who lived with only one arm could hang their washing out independently.

Our final speakers of the day were our current OT students who did a fantastic presentation on the use of the small aids that can be purchased and prescribed and what is out there for clients in our local area.

Following the sessions we received great feedback from clients who attended and suggestions for future sessions we will look to hold in the New Year.

Thank you to all of our guest speakers, and if you would like to find out more about aids and adaptations you can email our helpline for information today.

Best wishes,

Dean

Centre Manager, Josephs Court

Want to access counselling but worried about the assessment process?

Posted on: November 19 2018

Louise Willis crop_0.jpgMS-UK Counsellor, Louise Willis reveals what you can expect from MS-UK Counselling...

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) can present many physical challenges and some can be identified and treated by the medical profession, but what about the hidden emotional and mental challenges that can be faced?

MS affects around 110,000 people in the UK. Each person affected has a different life story, an individual set of beliefs and values, and ultimately a different way of dealing with diagnosis and the changes that MS can bring. There is no right or wrong way forward, but sometimes some extra support can be invaluable at any stage of MS. From diagnosis to new changes and developments, MS-UK counsellors are here for you every step of the way.

What should I expect from the assessment?

One of our trained counsellors will call you at a time that is suitable for you. We ask that you are alone at this time and in a quiet, confidential place and that you are comfortable as the call can take between 30 and 45 minutes. If you are unable to answer the call straight away, we will always ring back around 5 minutes later.

Is counselling confidential?

Yes, counselling is a safe and non-judgmental space for you to talk about any worries you might have about any aspect of your experience with MS. Any information we take down is kept on our encrypted servers here at MS-UK and is not passed on to any third parties unless you ask us to.

We will only break confidentiality in the event of a safeguarding issue which would mean any form of harm to either you or someone else.

What will I be asked?

We will ask you about what is bringing you to seek counselling and about any mental health issues you may have. We will also ask you what times and days are best for you for your counselling sessions. They will be at the same time and day each week for six weeks.

What happens if I can’t make a session?

If you are unable to make one of your sessions, let us know as soon as you find out and we can reschedule. However, if this is within 24 hours of the session you may forfeit the session as all of our counsellors are booked in advance.

How do I sign up?

Simply go to our website, call our helpline on 0800 783 0518 or ask your MS Nurse to contact us on your behalf.

Next Steps…

After your assessment we will pop a counselling contract in the post, or send it via email for you to sign ready to speak to one of our specially trained MS counsellors.

We look forward to meeting you!

Guest blog: My year living with multiple sclerosis

Posted on: November 19 2018

In his latest guest blog, Tom Cutts tells us about life with MS since being diagnosed a year ago...Photo of Tom Cutts

A year, wow, how time flies. At the time of writing this it’s exactly a year since I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Before that day I had no idea what MS was. Now all I think about is MS. Instead of thinking about what I want to do in 3 years time I’m now planning what I can do in 3 hours time. Every day is a different day. On a Saturday night I’m looking forward to my run in the morning and pumped up ready to go…then the morning comes. It’s Sunday. I’m struggling. Time to change my plans.

That is one of the things I’ve learnt most about MS. I’ve always made plans months in advance let alone weeks, but now I look at this in a new light. At first if I missed a plan I would sink to a new level, I felt like MS was controlling my life, I felt that it was the end of the world. Now I look at it and even though I’m still upset, I remember it’s only one day, they’ll be others I can attend. If you have amazing friends like I do then they’ll understand, as long as you let them. This brings me on nicely to what else I’ve learnt.

Talking. Talking about my MS, my depression, my everything is possibly the best thing I’ve learnt since being diagnosed. You shouldn’t have to bottle up what’s inside, it’s scary telling people but how else can someone help you? I’m not afraid to say that I had counselling. I’m not afraid to say I went home and cried after some sessions. I’m not afraid to say it is one of the things that’s helped me the most. It gave me the confidence to speak to my family, my friends, my girlfriend. It’s why I’m happy to be so public about everything I’ve been and am going through! Because of this they all understand what’s happening with me. MS doesn’t just affect the sufferer. I know that people have cried over my diagnosis and the affect it’s had on me, but I also know that being open and approachable about it has helped them. If I had to give one piece of advice to anyone suffering with something it would be to talk about it.

Do you have something you love to do? Love to see? For me fitness is the one thing I love to do. I may complain about running on a cold Tuesday night in Swindon, or a rainy Colchester morning, but once I’m out there I love it. Ok I lie (don’t judge me) but I love to read too. This year I’ve read over 30 books and they’re not just tiny books either! Escaping in to another world, furthering my knowledge in something, allowing myself to become fully immersed in a book has helped me through this year. Find something you love to do. Find something you want to love to do. Hobbies, interests, whatever it is, give it your all and you’ll appreciate it afterwards.

A year on and I still don’t really know what MS is. Does anyone?! I ask numerous silly questions multiple times and I will carry on doing this for as long as I live! One year down and hopefully many, many more to come. I’ll get there one day, maybe come back and ask again next year?!

Remain positive.

Tom

Find out more about MS-UK Counselling

MS-UK Counselling is a confidential service open to anyone living with MS. You can talk about your thoughts and feelings with a qualified professional that also has an understanding of MS. 

Visit our web page for more information

Guest blog: Keep calm and carry on

Posted on: November 19 2018

In her latest guest blog, Joanne Chapman tells us about her recent experiences living with multiple sclerosis (MS)...Photo of Joanne

It’s been a good while since I wrote. I’ve wanted on many occasions but life has been against me. When you live with a chronic illness, it's a constant uphill battle but when life chucks in more challenges, you just want to scream!

It’s that time of year when bugs bounce around. You do things to help to escape illness. I’ve chucked orange juice down me for the hope of that extra vitamin C prevents any illness but I’ve still sounded like Darth Vader. Little man’s nursery has been a hive of germs. You want him to go but battling against bugs is a neverending game. Me, then little man, me again. I think it was tennis germs. My immune system is even more shot to pieces since MS.

keep calm poster imageMy symptoms flare up when I’m sick, especially my fatigue. The MonSter comes back with a vengeance. Big effort! You just want a break. Last weekend, I woke up to not being able to walk. I bought a rollator/wheelchair combo as my scooter broke recently (another story). I needed a back up plan. Good job I did have one. Little man’s daddy wheeled me into church as I didn’t want to miss Remembrance Sunday service. I’ve got a poster used in the war “Keep calm and carry on”. You just remember what others have done to make you, your family and friends safe, and it all blends into perspective.

MS is a pig of a disease. When people ask, 'How are you?' and you reply 'OK', it’s because in the past replying with the truth doesn’t help many and it is easier, less effort to say 'OK'. Everyone has their challenges. You don’t know what they are. That’s the biggest lesson I’ve learnt from having MS. Simply be kind to others. You don’t know what sh*t they are dealing with.

I was recently given some drugs for my MS bladder as an interim solution as I’m waiting for Botox. I had a bad reaction to them, so no longer taking. I should have known as every drug I’ve taken has caused me medical grief. To add insult to injury, we’ve had home leaks to contend with. As the phrase goes, 'It never rains, only pours'. Little man’s daddy asked, 'Is that a joke?'

As you can read it’s been pretty interesting. Maybe I should rename my blog to “ poorly pi**ed off parent”. When I’m feeling rubbish, I think of that war poster “ keep calm and carry on”. That is my option, she says coughing again.

You can read more from Joanne on her blog, Poorly parents.

Guest blog: Gavin's marathon mission...

Posted on: November 19 2018

In April 2019, Gavin King will be taking on the Virgin Money London Marathon in aid of MS-UK. In this guest blog, Gavin tells us about why he’s chosen to fundraise for MS-UK, and how multiple sclerosis (MS) has had an impact on his family...Photo of Gavin, MS-UK fundraiser

‘After missing the chance to run the Virgin Money London Marathon through the ballot, I decided that for 2019 I would fundraise for a charity close to my heart, MS-UK. I'm pushing hard, taking on multiple challenges and races between now and the marathon. So far, fundraising is going ok.

‘My Dad was diagnosed with MS when I was a child. I still remember the day he sat me down and told me. I had no idea how bad MS was or how it was going to change our lives and yet it still tore me apart.

‘Sitting here now typing this still breaks my heart and brings a tear to my eye.

‘For the past 20+ years, I've seen MS take my father away from me. At first, it was only really fatigue that was noticeable and a few days where he wasn't great on his legs.

‘As time went on, he lost the ability to drive and eventually couldn't even walk or feed himself.

‘MS has also damaged his brain, wiping out his short term memory and his ability to talk. This has been the biggest impact on me, not being able to speak to him, ask him questions and all the things a son should be able to ask his father.

‘I regret not making the most of the last good years with him while I still had the chance.

My Mum cares for my Dad 24/7 which really takes its toll on her, she's stubborn though and does everything she can for him.

I chose MS-UK and the London Marathon to show my support for my family and to raise as many funds for such a supportive MS charity that gets much of its funding through the London Marathon charity places.’

You can find out more and make a donation on Gavin's JustGiving page

We’re here...

If you have been affected by this story, you can contact the MS-UK Helpline via email, on 0800 783 0518 or via live web chat. We’re here to provide information and support, or just to listen.

Lighting up the 'big red boat' for MS-UK!

Posted on: November 08 2018

08 November 2018

Around the corner from the MS-UK offices in Essex, a bright-red boat is moored by the quayside. It's an impressive sight. The deck is busy with cranes and pulleys. Porthole windows gaze out across the water. The light tower that rises from the deck is seen by hundreds (possibly thousands) of commuters crossing the nearby bridge on their way to and from work.

So imagine our surprise when the Colchester Sea Cadets, who use the boat as their base once a week, said that they'd be willing to turn the tower light purple to show their support for MS-UK.

Last Wednesday evening, we made the short trip down the riverfront to see the purple light in full glow. It was astounding to behold! Set against the dark night sky, the light blazed, bathing the riverside in bright purple and causing a few passing heads to turn.

We spoke to a couple of cadets who had come to meet us, and they talked us through how they had planned the fantastic show of colour. While most of their explanation was far beyond our understanding of all things nautical, we were incredibly grateful to them for pulling off something so magical for MS-UK!

Thanks to Colchester Sea Cadets for welcoming us to their one-of-a-kind home and for helping us 'paint the town purple' in preparation for the Colchester Half Marathon 2019.

Why not get involved? If you would like to run for MS-UK in next year's Colchester Half Marathon, get in touch with Jenny via email, or by filling in an online application form today!

 

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Listen... 3 stress-busting podcasts to help you unclutter your mind

Posted on: November 07 2018

07 November 2018

Everyone experiences stress in one way or another. It can affect you both physically and mentally, making you feel anxious and impatient. But stress doesn't have to dominate your daily routine.

To mark Stress Awareness Day 2018, we are giving you the opportunity to learn how to focus your mind with a series of stress-busting podcasts hosted by mindfulness coach Zoe Flint. Each step-by-step guide is designed to give you the tools you need to de-cutter your thoughts, focus on the present, and ultimately reduce your stress levels.

Want to get involved in the conversation? You can follow all the talk about Stress Awareness Day by searching for and using the hashtag #StressAwarenessDay on Twitter and Facebook.

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