About MS  > MS news and research  > ccsviresearch
About MS

What is MS?

MS symptoms

Managing your MS

Effects of MS

MS news and research

Bacteria and viruses

Biomarkers and microRNA

CCSVI

Cognition

Diet

Drugs

Endo-parasites and helpful organisms

Environmental factors

Ethnic groups, geographical regions and MS

Exercise

Genetics

Hormones

Immune cells

Inflammation, lesions & 'black holes'

Medical imaging

MS Symptoms research

Multiple Sclerosis (etiology)

Myelin

Nerves, brain cells and spinal cord

Paediatric MS

Pain

Potential viral causes

Quality of life

Retroviruses

Sex and MS

Stem cells

Technology

Types of MS

Vaccinations

Vitamin D

World MS Day

News and research archive

Other support

Donate with JustGiving

Latest Tweets

CCSVI

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency is described as a chronic problem (ongoing) where blood from the brain and spine has trouble getting back to the heart.

It is caused by a narrowing in the veins (stenosis) that drain the brain and the spine. Blood takes longer to return to the heart, and it can reflux back into the brain and spine or cause oedema and leakage of red blood cells and fluids into the tissues of the brain and spine.

Blood that remains in the brain too long creates a delay in deoxyginated blood leaving the head ("slowed perfusion"). This can cause hypoxia, a lack of oxygen in the brain. Plasma and iron from blood deposited in the brain tissue can also be very damaging leading to iron along with other unwelcome cells crossing the crucial brain-blood barrier.

Prevalence of CCSVI in multiple sclerosis: a blinded sonographic evaluation(23/01/15)

L Tromba, S Blasi, A Vestri, D Kiltzanidi, F Tartaglia, A Redler

Abstract

Objectives: To verify the prevalence of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in patients affected by different clinical forms of multiple sclerosis and in healthy subjects using the Zamboni ultrasound protocol combined with M-mode ultrasound examination.

Materials and methods: We enrolled 112 patients with multiple sclerosis and 67 healthy subjects from 20 to 67 years of age. All the patients underwent Duplex and color-Doppler sonography of the neck vessels, transcranial colour duplex sonography, M-mode study of the valve system and of venous abnormalities. Subjects were positive for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency when at least two of five hemodynamic criteria of the Zamboni protocol were fulfilled. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency condition was further analyzed by a multivariate analysis including age, sex, disease duration, subtypes of multiple sclerosis and expanded disability status scale score as independent variables.

Results: No healthy subjects was positive for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, while in the sample of patients affected by multiple sclerosis the diagnosis was made in 59.8% of cases (p < 0.0001). The first criterion was the most frequent in patients affected by multiple sclerosis and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (respectively 54.4% and 76.1%, p < 0.001). The second, third and fourth criteria were never present in healthy subjects but were detected in patients with multiple sclerosis. The positivity of the second criterion was associated with diagnosis of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in 100% of cases. The third criterion had a prevalence of 52.2% in the subgroup of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency patients. It was positive in 36 multiple sclerosis patients and was associated with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency diagnosis in all cases except one. The multivariate analysis showed that age, disease duration, sex, subtypes of multiple sclerosis and expanded disability status scale score were not considered predictors of this haemodynamic condition.

Conclusion: Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency is a haemodynamic condition strongly associated with multiple sclerosis and is not found in normal controls. The addition of M-mode ultrasound to the diagnostic protocol allows improved observation of venous valve abnormalities.

Full Article 

Source: Phlebology: The Journal of Venous Disease © 2015 by SAGE Publications (23/01/15)